Recording & Mixing
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Recording & Mixing

Comments about the feature article: Recording Garbage

 
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Mike Levine

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Mike Levine
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1 Posted on 06/29/2017 at 12:41:25Direct link to this post
Recording Garbage
Although he wasn’t formally trained in engineering, producer/engineer Billy Bush learned to record and mix from two of the best, Butch Vig of Garbage, and legendary producer Rick Rubin. Bush, who has been Garbage’s engineer since the 1990’s, has a discography that also includes artists like Snow Patrol, Jake Bugg, Dweezil Zappa, the Naked & Famous, Fink, Neon Trees and The Boxer Rebellion.

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David Campbell

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2 Posted on 07/03/2017 at 06:37:09Direct link to this post
It's always cool to read about fellow Kansan's and how they made it in the music industry.
The work ethic it took for him to get to where he is proves that hard work does pay off. You don't have to be born into money or a famous family to get to where you want to be. Billy proves that theory to be true.

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Sarakyel

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3 Posted on 07/14/2017 at 04:08:08Direct link to this post
Yeah, awesome piece of interview from a very down to earth, seasoned professional. That's really humbling!

Back in those days, Garbage was definitely an instrumental band when it came down to switching to the digital world and raising the bar in terms of production value. Some of their songs from Version 2.0 really nailed the sound of industrial rock much better than any other big record from the late 80's/90's, including NIN or Marilyn Manson.

This article really makes me want to hear more. I wish Billy went further in-depth as to how they came up with the actual sound of some of these songs, starting with Push It. How many tracks were there per instrument/ total in the final mixing session? What was the standard processing chain? What was their approach to compression? etc. But that's probably just me being too eager to know more about one of my favorite records of all times! :bave:
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