Gibson Les Paul Standard - Ebony
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Gibson Les Paul Standard - Ebony

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Les Paul Standard - Ebony, LP-Shaped Guitar from Gibson in the Les Paul series.


4 user reviews

Gibson Les Paul Standard - Ebony tech. sheet

  • Manufacturer:Gibson
  • Model:Les Paul Standard - Ebony
  • Series:Les Paul
  • Category:LP-Shaped Guitars
  • Added in our database on: 12/14/2007

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Gibson Les Paul Standard - Ebony user reviews

Average Score:4.5( 4.5/5 based on 4 reviews )
 2 reviews50 %
 2 reviews50 %
tjon90108/11/2011

tjon901's review"Les Paul Standard with a thin neck"

Gibson Les Paul Standard - Ebony
In the early 60s Gibson was looking to make their guitars a bit easier to play. Fender was out selling them with their guitars so they had to change up the feel of their guitars. This eventually led to the Les Paul being replaced by the SG but before that they tried to fix some perceived problems with the Les Paul. This early 60s style Les Paul has a super thin 60s profile neck. Which is found on most SG guitars. This guitar has a mahogany body with a maple top. The set neck is mahogany with the mentioned 60s profile neck. It has a rosewood fretboard and a cool black finish. It has vintage looking aged green tuners. It has a set of Burstbucker pickups and the standard controls.

UTILIZATION

These guitars are very playable because of their 60s neck profiles. The body shape is standard Les Paul so most of it plays like a normal Les Paul. The 60s neck profile is something you find more on SG guitars. Gibson Les Pauls with these necks are pretty rare but when they make them they play really well. With these thinner necks you can really wrap your hand around them. These guitars have a really nice setup out of the box due to Gibsons Plek process. A Plek machine is a machine that uses a laser to level the frets on a guitar to crazy accuracy. This means the out of the box setup on these guitars are very good.

SOUNDS

This guitar has a great Les Paul tone. It has a full bodied mahogany sound which is what you expect when it comes to a Gibson Les Paul. The neck pickup is nice and smooth like you want with a Les Paul. The tone is perfect for blues or classic rock leads right out of the box. The bridge pickup has a nice hot rodded sound to it. It has a good crunch going that could do heavy rock. With some clean tones the guitar is good for blues and Jazz. With these pickups I dont think it would cut the mustard for a metal tone. If you are looking for that kind of sound you may want to swap in some Duncans or a set of active EMG's if you want the ultimate in metal tone.

OVERALL OPINION

The Les Paul Standard is what people think when they think Les Paul. There are models above and below it but this is the workhorse that more people have used throughout the years than any other. And throughout the years it has gone through changes. This guitar represents a certain era in the guitars history where it had its unique style and playability that stemmed from the needs and requirements of a guitar at that time. A lot of those needs are things people still want today. People like smaller necks because more people find them very comfortable to play. This is this models strong point. If you are looking for a good standard Les Paul with a slim neck that you can really play Gibson has you hooked up right here.
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Hatsubai07/15/2011

Hatsubai's review"Very solid guitar"

Gibson Les Paul Standard - Ebony
The Standard has long since been the go-to model for Les Paul lovers all around the world, and it's for good reason. This is the guitar that really started it all. The 50s neck on here is the big point as it's a bit thicker than the normal necks out there. The guitar features a mahogany body with a maple top, mahogany neck with a rosewood fretboard, 22 frets, trapezoid inlays, pickguard, binding, hard tail bridge, two humbuckers, two volumes, two tones and a three way switch.

UTILIZATION

These are the regular Standards that most people know and love from yesteryear, but they seem to lack the vibe the older ones have. The fretwork was good on this, and the nut was cut correctly. However, I think the neck angle might have been off by a touch. I didn't have any way to measure it, but it looked a little different. It could have just been this guitar or my eyes. I'm not entirely sure.

SOUNDS

The guitar sounded pretty good, but it was a touch on the bright side compared to some of the other ones I've tried. The bridge has some nice bite to it while remaining decently thick sounding. You could easily do everything from blues to heavy metal with this thing. The neck pickup had a nice vowely tone, but I prefer hotter and smoother neck pickups. Rolling down the tone knob helped get the fattness I wanted, but it still didn't have that "oomph" that I like. I'm thinking it came down to the wood more than anything else.

OVERALL OPINION

Be sure to play a lot of these before you buy one. Choose the one that both plays the best and sounds the best. There are some QC issues that can occur, but they're generally not too hard to remedy if you do have one that's a bit iffy. My favorite mod to these guitars, aside from a pickup change, is locking tuners. They really add some stability for tuning, as well as making string changes a lot quicker.
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tjon90107/07/2011

tjon901's review"Fat neck Les Paul Standard"

Gibson Les Paul Standard - Ebony
This guitar is a Les Paul Standard that gives the feel of a real 50s Les Paul. The biggest difference with this guitar is that it has the 50s profile neck. Everyone knows the story of the famed 50s Les Paul Standard. The Les Paul standard guitar was introduced in 1958. They came with the first PAF pickups and when people talk about the Gibson tone they are talking about these. They were only made for two years and less than 2000 were made. They stopped making these when they came out with the 61 Les Paul which became the SG. The current Les Paul standard was introduced in 2008 and it has many of the same features as the original. The main difference and problem with these guitars is that they are chambered for weight. This effects the tone and makes them kind of sound like hollow body guitars. They have the standard Les Paul setup with mahogany body with a maple top and a mahogany neck with a 22 fret rosewood fretboard. Two humbucking pickups with dual volume and tone controls with a 3 way toggle switch pickup selector. The up position on the switch selects the neck pickup. The middle position on the pickup selector selects both pickups. And the down position on the pickup selector selects the bridge pickup.

UTILIZATION

The Les Paul naturally is not the best playing guitar out there. But with the 50s neck it takes it to a whole new level of vintage. The 50s neck is what they call the baseball neck. It is probably the biggest neck you can find on a guitar sold nowadays. Because of the set neck design there is a large neck tenon and joint. This can make the upper frets hard for some people to reach because the body essentially joins the neck at the 17th fret. After the 17th fret you are reaching around the body to get to the frets. The tuning stability is good because there is no tremolo. When you change strings the bridge can come off because it is held on by string tension. If this happens make sure you put it on the right way because you can put it on backwards and your intonation will be horribly off. When this happens your guitar will sound in tune on the open strings but any chords you play will sound off.

SOUNDS

A 58 Les Paul standard is the tone that everyone thinks about when they say Les Paul sound. With the chambered body the sound is quite different. A few years ago Gibson started chambering their guitars for weight. I think they were giving in to some people they should not have. People who complain about weight are obviously not playing a Les Paul for the tone. The guitar comes with Burstbucker 2 and 3 pickups. A 2 in the neck and a 3 in the bridge. With Burstbucker pickups the higher the number is the hotter they are. The 2 pickup is a little hot and bright for the neck position. I had to roll off some tone knob to get a neck pickup tone I liked. Once you did that you can get nice smooth leads with the neck position. The 3 is good in the bridge. The 3 has great bite and clarity. It might even be too bright for some people depending on what kind of amp they are using. I think they used a 2 in the neck to compliment the 3 in the bridge. I would have preferred a 1 in the neck and a 3 in the bridge. With a 1 in the neck it would have no problem getting smooth neck tones.

OVERALL OPINION

Since this is a Gibson it will hold its value well. I am pretty sure there are other new Gibson models that better replicate the 58 guitar. If i was looking for a Les Paul nowadays I would steer clear of any chambered guitars. Part of the Gibson tone is the mass of the guitar. Making the guitar lighter is putting comfort ahead of tone. People in the 50s would laugh at you if you complained that your guitar was too heavy. If you are looking for a light guitar that plays like its from the 50s but doesnt sound like it is from the 50s this guitar is for you I guess.
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litteulstef07/13/2008

litteulstef's review (This content has been automatically translated from French)

Gibson Les Paul Standard - Ebony
Electric guitar solid body. U.S. manufacturing (Nashville, Tennessee)
Mahogany body with carved table Rabl (AA quality)
Mahogany (60's slim profile type) with rosewood (22 squares)
Scale 24 3 / 4 "
Nickel fittings
Tune-o-matic
Cordier Stopbar
2 Alnico V pickups Burstbucker Pro
2 volume, 2 tone, 3-position micro Slecteur

UTILIZATION

The neck profile is not as big as a 60 50 ', even if we lose parat sustain a little ... Well, let's. Has tight deadlines that sounds good when roughly even. CHAC is moderately easy to acute, but a les paul c, to be expected. The varnish is great. particulire DGIG smell it when you open the box for the first time. The weight is a bit heavy (especially since I played on Fender ...) and we feel good at the end of repeat or set. But we get his little fact, this is a Gibson, a legendary guitar. It is true that it is ds branch, a ring, a ring even though rudemment.

SOUNDS

I play rock and pop, blues and some hard rock, it suits any style, but dpend what one expects. On Stones I often prfre my fender and handle Rabl. This fits better than the rosewood fingerboard. Matter of taste. Anyway, she sends. I play on a Twintone Koch II, trs little effect (wah, chorus and delay), overdrive the amp enough. The sound is the heavy, thick and velvety. J'aime bcp the microphone handle.

OVERALL OPINION

I use it for 4 months now and I like especially its complementarity with my fender. Least, it would be the weight. Another thing too, the c ct "wow, did you see the gibson! It is beautiful," the kid of 14 who attends the set. Above all, I also like t a. C so that a kid j'assouvis rve. So I tried a few MODELS if we're talking guitar brand, but bcp les paul diffrent DCID before going for it. That said, I bought it in Germany for 1600, new. The report price is good quality and the choice, I do it again without hsiter since the time I expected from the possder bte ...
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  • Gibson Les Paul Standard - Ebony
  • Gibson Les Paul Standard - Ebony
  • Gibson Les Paul Standard - Ebony
  • Gibson Les Paul Standard - Ebony

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