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Squier Vintage Modified Jazzmaster Special
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All user reviews for the Squier Vintage Modified Jazzmaster Special

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Average Score:
( 4.4/5 based on 8 reviews )
3 reviews
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5 reviews
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Value For Money : Excellent
Users reviews
  • More than correct!

    Squier Vintage Modified Jazzmaster SpecialPublished on 01/04/14 at 09:33
    (This content has been automatically translated from French)
    I play it for 7 months.

    I tried other models Squier in the same price range:
    - Classic Strat vibe: very faithful to its good reputation but not original forcment (look, sound ...);
    - Jaguar vintage modified: the most beautiful, all in chrome. But very difficult to play (the strings that dplacent on the rack ...) and hyper nasal sound;
    - Mofified vintage jaguar HH: Almost twin of the Jazzmaster ... but with humbuckers (hyper-biting his hideous). For me, no relation to a jaguar (in addition, even no vibrato: gniale for surf guitar) ...

    This model of Jazzmaster is when even very particular:
    - No vibrato (why?!?) Nor rglages doubles (which admittedly is not used much), the......
    Read more
    I play it for 7 months.

    I tried other models Squier in the same price range:
    - Classic Strat vibe: very faithful to its good reputation but not original forcment (look, sound ...);
    - Jaguar vintage modified: the most beautiful, all in chrome. But very difficult to play (the strings that dplacent on the rack ...) and hyper nasal sound;
    - Mofified vintage jaguar HH: Almost twin of the Jazzmaster ... but with humbuckers (hyper-biting his hideous). For me, no relation to a jaguar (in addition, even no vibrato: gniale for surf guitar) ...

    This model of Jazzmaster is when even very particular:
    - No vibrato (why?!?) Nor rglages doubles (which admittedly is not used much), the DIFFERENT knobs (two volume, two tone ...) and locations also DIFFERENT (the switch, the jack in "strat" ​​...) from a classic Jazzmaster;
    - Look a little limited, despite a good finish: including the same color as the pickguard pickups: what heresy!

    Must admit: the term "vintage modified" is spcieuse. There has never been such a model "original" of the Jazzmaster.

    Goodies:
    - The quality of its flaws: the extreme simplicity. A hybrid Jazzmaster / Telecaster in short;
    - The handle of maple, apparently on INDIT Jazzmaster. These guitars have rput 'of being easy to play, but then the ... a slide, a bend all is: it is paradise;
    - Sound: rounder than the Strat, rich and well bite with distortion. These dishes microphones, what an invention! That's what made me to prefer the Jazzmaster classic strat vibe, it said. I want to believe that for once, we are well within the "vintage" in the sense where the sound is warm and returns happily things heard on 60's disk (after, it all depends on the amp).

    In conclusion:
    Very, good guitar. If I was doing the poking, I rachterais probably the same. I regret even when not being able to try the model with vibrato. But it would not have had the maple handle. I guess it's for reasons of production costs ...

    Must therefore say that this is a hybrid Jazzmaster espce. Qualitprix the report is in my imabatable. 300 ... Propose instruments of such a class to small grants (if I may): squier really has a public interest activity!
    See less
  • TelesPaul or LesPaster?

    Squier Vintage Modified Jazzmaster SpecialPublished on 09/22/14 at 11:30
    (This content has been automatically translated from French)
    In big fan of indie rock broke I wanted to pay me a Jazzmaster not too expensive so I took this nice Squier. But I do not know if we can talk about Jazzmaster with this model: key, easel, electronic, there is not much to do with the original model.
  • TelesPaul or LesPaster?

    Squier Vintage Modified Jazzmaster SpecialPublished on 09/22/14 at 12:25
    (This content has been automatically translated from French)
    In big fan of indie rock broke I wanted to pay me a Jazzmaster not too expensive so I took this nice Squier. But I do not know if we can talk about Jazzmaster with this model: key bridge, electronics, there is not much to do with the original model.

    The alder body, maple neck one piece, no key reported. The first thing that heckled me when I grip the radius is the key: it is virtually non-existent, the button is almost flat it is a little surprising at first but got used to it pretty quickly.

    The electronics allows a lot of possibilities, only small inconvenience adjusting rings tones have the tendency to cause those volumes when one drives by and large volumes have to go back......
    Read more
    In big fan of indie rock broke I wanted to pay me a Jazzmaster not too expensive so I took this nice Squier. But I do not know if we can talk about Jazzmaster with this model: key bridge, electronics, there is not much to do with the original model.

    The alder body, maple neck one piece, no key reported. The first thing that heckled me when I grip the radius is the key: it is virtually non-existent, the button is almost flat it is a little surprising at first but got used to it pretty quickly.

    The electronics allows a lot of possibilities, only small inconvenience adjusting rings tones have the tendency to cause those volumes when one drives by and large volumes have to go back every time we fall tones since the concentric knobs are on this guitar.

    Nothing wrong issue finishes, not screw around, not the least spilled varnish also that of the handle is to my taste particularly good. The icing on the cake is quartersawn maple on mine, at a price like this is pretty neat.

    Let the sound now, it's mostly where the difference with the original model arises because this guitar sounds, to my ears at least, a sort of cross between a risky Les Paul and a Telecaster. She achieved the feat of having a thick sound and dry at the time, it sounds a little weird all that I own but it's hard to put into words and sounds to me it's really the image that best sums up that of the craft.

    I wanted a beautiful clear the Fender sound when I bought it, I realized that I never would have: there is an acute glut really sharp, especially on the bridge pickup is almost strident. Even the neck pickup alone does not work miracles, still these unwanted treble.

    I still wanted to see what she gave in saturated and there it was the slap, the famous mix of Les Paul and Tele I mentioned a little above. She has a sound that is unique to her, I may be wrong but I completely think it's the width of coils pickups that brings the thickness and the slamming of the maple key tempers everything. We keep the definition and one side a little dry while having at the same time its really consists. For the garage or crunch sounds a bit grimey this is madness.

    Finally I find the value of this guitar properly indecent, provided they satisfy the clear sound that to me is his only fault.
    See less
  • good and cheap

    Squier Vintage Modified Jazzmaster SpecialPublished on 01/05/14 at 10:47
    (This content has been automatically translated from French)
    This is my first Jazzmaster. I had never bought it because-I do not like the rosewood keys and jap price is too high in my opinion. This is an excellent guitar came very well set.
    The handle is excellent
    The ergonomics are perfect
    Microphones: then it's a good surprise, the duncan designed, I said "as soon as you got the tunes you the vires", but I keep them, they are very good, I can not compare with other micro Jazzmaster but I have seymour duncan, gibson custom and sp as my strato classic vibe 50, I decided to keep them. The neck pickup sends terribly, vintage and powerful time. The bridge pickup if I compare her more like a tele than a strat or micro jaguar (outside my CV50......
    Read more
    This is my first Jazzmaster. I had never bought it because-I do not like the rosewood keys and jap price is too high in my opinion. This is an excellent guitar came very well set.
    The handle is excellent
    The ergonomics are perfect
    Microphones: then it's a good surprise, the duncan designed, I said "as soon as you got the tunes you the vires", but I keep them, they are very good, I can not compare with other micro Jazzmaster but I have seymour duncan, gibson custom and sp as my strato classic vibe 50, I decided to keep them. The neck pickup sends terribly, vintage and powerful time. The bridge pickup if I compare her more like a tele than a strat or micro jaguar (outside my CV50 strat I never liked the sound of microphones strats, my tastes in sound microphones are simple vintage and modern sound doubles. At the game I use this guitar for rhythm, for solos I prefer my gibson in 498/490 and my strat classic vibe. I love when I have recorded several grains and I mix modern and vintage microphones sound is vintage but my pedalboard (electro harmonix) my only digital reverb pedal cathedral, the more vintage digital I think amp and I play at home on a Blackstar HT5 and j ' recorded on an old marshall plexi. But for the price it is quite a surprise, because I ordered it-that to try guitars in this series (vintage modified) it is not obvious, the stores have not in stock or lying around but never this one, but this is normal because the quality for the price is so good that if you play two identical guitars of different ranges, you may not find anything better than from 1800 € in fender, because the 2 lines CV and VM are excellent, I have never found us drinking Southwestern and standards are really not made for me (too modern level.) This is the only VM Alder. account I buy 2 other identical to transform into a true Jazzmaster (wiring and vibrato but I put a Mustang) with SP custom pickups and one Telemaster with SD because I have a Squier Tele (low range) with custom SP. Once mounted with custom SP, I'll make the comparison in a store with a U.S. Jazzmaster and then I'll tell you what I think. I think also buy a standard VM Jazzmaster for see if indeed the correct timber is basswood. This guitar is not versatile, but it is not what is asked. The sound is vintage but the output level of the microphone is quite high.'s pickup is worse than the neck pickup is excellent. account I also put microphones handle my future purchases on a epi firebird that the couple will be a Burstbucker 3 pickups in the bridge and duncan designed Jazzmaster in the neck and a custom 77 cs3 I will couple the handle duncan designed with a sh sd 13, the output level seems pretty close. So a skyscraper vintage cheap with good microphones. states that the Jazzmaster I do not look anything like his level and handle the jaguar that I do not like even if it's a great guitar.
    See less
  • More than correct!

    Squier Vintage Modified Jazzmaster SpecialPublished on 01/04/14 at 10:19
    (This content has been automatically translated from French)
    I play it for 7 months.

    I tried other yamaha models in the same price range:
    - Strat classic vibe: true to its very good reputation but not necessarily original (looks, ...);
    - Jaguar vintage modified: the most beautiful, all chrome. But very complicated to play (strings moving on the bridge ...) and a hyper nasal sound;
    - Jaguar vintage mofified HH: quasi-twin but with the Jazzmaster ... humbuckers (a hyper-biting her hideous). For me, no connection with jaguar (in addition, even tremolo great for surf guitar) ...

    This model Jazzmaster is still very particular:
    - No vibrato (why??) Or dual settings (which, admittedly, is not used much), different knobs (two volume, two tone......
    Read more
    I play it for 7 months.

    I tried other yamaha models in the same price range:
    - Strat classic vibe: true to its very good reputation but not necessarily original (looks, ...);
    - Jaguar vintage modified: the most beautiful, all chrome. But very complicated to play (strings moving on the bridge ...) and a hyper nasal sound;
    - Jaguar vintage mofified HH: quasi-twin but with the Jazzmaster ... humbuckers (a hyper-biting her hideous). For me, no connection with jaguar (in addition, even tremolo great for surf guitar) ...

    This model Jazzmaster is still very particular:
    - No vibrato (why??) Or dual settings (which, admittedly, is not used much), different knobs (two volume, two tone ...), and also different locations (the switch, jack in "strat" ​​mode ...) with respect to a classic Jazzmaster;
    - A look a bit limited, despite a good finish: including microphones in the same color as the pickguard: what heresy!

    I must admit: the label "vintage modified" is specious. There was never any such "original" model of this Jazzmaster.

    Goodies:
    - The quality of its faults: the extreme simplicity. A hybrid jazzmaster / telecaster in short;
    - Maple neck, apparently unprecedented in Jazzmaster. These guitars have kicki 'to be easy to play, but then ... it slips, it will bend at all: it's paradise;
    - Sound: rounder than the strat, rich and well bite with distortion. These dishes microphones, what an invention! This is what makes me prefer the Jazzmaster to strat classic vibe, it said. I want to believe that for once, it is in the "vintage" in the sense that the sound is warm and refers to things heard with pleasure on hard 60's (after all depends on the amp).

    In conclusion:
    Very, good guitar. If I did the quilting, I probably would buy the same. I still regret not having tried the model with vibrato. But it would not have had the maple neck. I guess this is for reasons of production costs ...

    Therefore must say that this is a Jazzmaster hybrid species. The price / quality ratio is in my imabatable. € 300 ... Suggest instruments such class small grants (if I may): squier really an activity of public interest!
    See less
  • Good Jazzmaster

    Squier Vintage Modified Jazzmaster SpecialPublished on 02/23/13 at 14:22
    (This content has been automatically translated from French)
    I used this guitar for 2 years (Blues / Rock), I bought it out of curiosity at first because many people defended the thesis that one could find the sound of a Jazzmaster 50s'. This is not so wrong, you can say it is very close indeed.
    The sound was fit for my ears, speak a little comfort and look:
    I think very vintage as many guitar like, very comfortable on the handle even if it takes a little time when you're not familiar (especially to meet the acute standing)

    I am separated but there is little even though I found it best to my ears, it remains an excellent quality / price ratio (beginner and intermediate could find something) and if one day I want to playback on this model......
    Read more
    I used this guitar for 2 years (Blues / Rock), I bought it out of curiosity at first because many people defended the thesis that one could find the sound of a Jazzmaster 50s'. This is not so wrong, you can say it is very close indeed.
    The sound was fit for my ears, speak a little comfort and look:
    I think very vintage as many guitar like, very comfortable on the handle even if it takes a little time when you're not familiar (especially to meet the acute standing)

    I am separated but there is little even though I found it best to my ears, it remains an excellent quality / price ratio (beginner and intermediate could find something) and if one day I want to playback on this model and well content that the price is very affordable (I worked for two weeks in a fast food for purchase) I think, yes I would do this choice.
    See less
  • Vintage vibe, with modern advancements.

    Squier Vintage Modified Jazzmaster SpecialPublished on 11/16/11 at 09:36
    Specs:


    Body: Alder
    Body Shape: Jazzmaster®
    Body Finish:
    (0302800503, 0302800550)
    Polyester
    Neck

    Neck Shape: "C" Shape
    Number of Frets: 21
    Fret Size: Medium Jumbo
    Fretboard Radius: 9.5" (24.1 cm)
    Fretboard: Maple
    Neck Material: Maple
    Neck Finish: Polyester
    Nut Width: 1.650” (42 mm)
    Scale Length: 25.5" (64.8 cm)
    Electronics

    Bridge Pickup: Duncan Designed™ JM-101B Single-Coil Jazzmaster® Pickup with AlNiCo 5 Magnets
    Neck Pickup: Duncan Designed™ JM-101N Single-Coil Jazzmaster® Pickup with AlNiCo 5 Magnets
    Controls: 3-Position Toggle: Position 1. Bridge Pickup, Position 2. Bridge and Neck Pickups, Position 3. Neck Pickup
    Hardware

    Hardware: Chrome
    Bridge: Fixed "Top Loader" Bridge
    Read more
    Specs:


    Body: Alder
    Body Shape: Jazzmaster®
    Body Finish:
    (0302800503, 0302800550)
    Polyester
    Neck

    Neck Shape: "C" Shape
    Number of Frets: 21
    Fret Size: Medium Jumbo
    Fretboard Radius: 9.5" (24.1 cm)
    Fretboard: Maple
    Neck Material: Maple
    Neck Finish: Polyester
    Nut Width: 1.650” (42 mm)
    Scale Length: 25.5" (64.8 cm)
    Electronics

    Bridge Pickup: Duncan Designed™ JM-101B Single-Coil Jazzmaster® Pickup with AlNiCo 5 Magnets
    Neck Pickup: Duncan Designed™ JM-101N Single-Coil Jazzmaster® Pickup with AlNiCo 5 Magnets
    Controls: 3-Position Toggle: Position 1. Bridge Pickup, Position 2. Bridge and Neck Pickups, Position 3. Neck Pickup
    Hardware

    Hardware: Chrome
    Bridge: Fixed "Top Loader" Bridge
    Miscellaneous

    Strings: Fender® USA, NPS, (.010-.046 Gauges)
    Unique Features: Concentric Volume/Tone Knobs, Duncan Designed™ pickups, "Top-Loader" Fixed Bridge
    Accessories

    Control Knobs: Stacked Concentric Controls Volume 1. (Neck Pickup), Tone 1. (Neck Pickup), Volume 2. (Bridge Pickup), Tone 2. (Bridge Pickup)


    The Vintage Modified Jazzmaster from Fender's Squier division is a great entry into the world of low-priced, vintage-style axes. This guitar cops an extremely vintage vibe, yet has a few streamlined improvements over the original Jazzmaster design of the 50s. The original Jazzmaster featured a convoluted control system that most players disabled and rewired. This guitar has a simple 2 dual concentric pot system, with a 3-way toggle switch, so the controls act like a Gibson setup, only taking up less space. The bridge is also now a stop tail piece, as the old Jazzmaster bridge ended up making the guitar frequently go out of tune. This new bridge improves upon that aspect considerably!

    The guitar itself plays very well - the construction of the guitar is fantastic for the price. And the sound of the Duncan designed pickups is very meaty and cutting, great for classic rock, indie, blues, and surf sounds mainly. One caveat with the pickups is that they do induce a bit of noisy hum into the signal, but I've heard much worse - these pickups aren't bad, I just thought I'd point that out. This Jazzmaster is simpler all the way around than the original, and I like the design better. It's a winner in my book.
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  • Very, very cool

    Squier Vintage Modified Jazzmaster SpecialPublished on 08/13/11 at 15:49
    The new Squier Vintage Modified Jazzmaster is a great new reproduction of the famed Fender Jazzmaster guitar of the late '50s, but with a stripped down etho that does away with many of the rather strange and generally not used small thumbwheel controls. It has Jazzmaster style single coils designed by Seymour Duncan and built for Squier. The model I tried had a hardtail Danelectro style bridge and vintage tuners. The body is alder, and the neck is maple with 21 jumbo frets. They are made in Squier's factories overseas (they can vary between places like China and India). However this still produces a great sounding Jazzmaster reproduction, especially considering the price of $300 that......
    Read more
    The new Squier Vintage Modified Jazzmaster is a great new reproduction of the famed Fender Jazzmaster guitar of the late '50s, but with a stripped down etho that does away with many of the rather strange and generally not used small thumbwheel controls. It has Jazzmaster style single coils designed by Seymour Duncan and built for Squier. The model I tried had a hardtail Danelectro style bridge and vintage tuners. The body is alder, and the neck is maple with 21 jumbo frets. They are made in Squier's factories overseas (they can vary between places like China and India). However this still produces a great sounding Jazzmaster reproduction, especially considering the price of $300 that they cost.

    The design of the Jazzmaster is surprisingly one of the most ergonomic I've ever tried. The contouring is even more so than the Strat, and the weight is generally extremely light as well. Generally a light weight on a cheap guitar makes me feel dubious about the quality of wood being used, but it's obviously good resonant alder in this case. The upper fret access is near perfect. The cutaway allows PERFECT access right to the end of the neck (something even Strats don't have) and I'm sure if it had a tremolo and some hotter humbuckers it would be well received as a shredder guitar if given time.

    Getting a good tone out of this guitar is far easier than the USA Jazzmaster because the controls are simply concentric volume/tone pots (IE: a volume and tone for each pickup) and a 3 way toggle switch. It does away with all the odd little thumb switches that you see on USA Jazzmasters which are little tonal alterations that are hard to really mess around with on the fly. This guitar just plugs in and goes right to the core tone.

    I've tried this guitar through various Fender and Mesa Boogie amplifiers. I firstly noted how loud and resonant the guitar was when unplugged. It was enough that when I first picked it up and played a bit of old bebop, I had heads turning from a fair distance away to listen. Given this criteria, I knew that the guitar would definitely sound good plugged in, and it didn't disappoint there either. It has a great tone that reminds me of a cross between a Tele, a Les Paul and a solidbody Grestch... very midrange voiced but with a persistent top end that really drives the sound and gives it a unique jangly character. The neck pickup is perfect for jazz and early blues/R&B tones, especially with a tad bit of dirt applied. The middle position is like the love child of a Tele and a Les Paul... perfect for chicken pickin'... but with that little bit of extra midrange that you'd associate with a dual humbucker Les Paul guitar. The bridge pickup is very bright and responsive, but it doesn't ever cause ear fatigue. I especially liked this pickup with a bit of classic gain applied for some '70s hard rock tones that had the grunt of a Gibson but the brightness of a Fender.

    All in all I think Gibson is onto a winner with the Vintage Modified series of guitars. They combine many features that are simply useable and workable into a value priced and well made guitar. At $300 new this guitar is an absolute steal for the quality and tones that you get, and I wouldn't be surprised if we see them go up in price eventually.
    See less
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