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Thread Framing glass for VO Booth window.

  • 3 replies
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ernest savage

ernest savage

1 post
New AFfiliate
First post
1 Posted on 11/19/2014 at 12:47:16
Hope this is where you post new threads.

I'm finishing a VO Booth. I need to frame in a 1/2 laminate window. I have an existing double pain window, but the STC rating is not high enough. I'd like to install 1/2 laminate glass 2 inches away from it, creating a 2" air gap. I have a few questions.

Existing window and frame:

https://www.dropbox.com/s/frmd98lidfhy9o5/existing%20vo%20booth%20window.jpg?dl=0

I think I should reframe the window sill, using 1/4" mass load vinyl to separate the new wood from the existing wood and glass. Place the new laminate glass in a sandwich frame, and place that frame on top of the new window frame.

Step 1:

New framing area:

https://www.dropbox.com/s/zqow36jjazr0pah/VO%20Booth%20Glass%201.jpg?dl=0

Glue 1/4" mass load vinyl around the existing window frame, and up the glass 2" around frame, creating an "L" shape of vinyl for the the new 2"x6" hardwood window frame to sit on.

Finish nail, and use a few screws to place new 2"x6" frame around existing frame on top of new vinyl. This new frame will extended the space available to sandwich new glass with a 2" air gap, and still have enough room to nail/glue last piece of sandwich frame around glass.

Step 2:

New laminate glass sandwich:

https://www.dropbox.com/s/fd44cmqhkt8tlry/VO%20Booth%20Glass%202.jpg?dl=0

Cut a 2"x4" hard wood in half to create two 2"x 2"s. Finish nail/glue the first 2"x2" against new window frame and existing window. Place silica? beads for moisture. Glue new glass into place. Finish nail/glue last 2"x2".

Questions:

1. The specific name of the "acoustic glue" I should use to seal the window? I see all kinds of references to acoustic glue, but no names. Green glue says it is NOT an adhesive, so can that be used?

2. Does my new wood need to be 2"s thick? Would 1" suffice? Should I use hardwood like Maple or Oak? I'm thinking only of sound transmission, as I will be painting the wood. MDF instead?

3. I'm pretty sure I need the mass load vinyl to separate the new window frame from existing wall, however, should I add mass load vinyl again, after the new frame and before the window sandwich? I have 1/8" mass load vinyl I could use as well.

4. Anything else I'm doing wrong?
angelie

angelie

350 posts
AFfluent Poster
2 Posted on 11/19/2014 at 15:23:56
The 2 windows may not touch eachother so the air space between them is a good thing to have. sound doesn't like to traffel between constant changing materials

Best is to place one or both window(s) in an angle
This is for preventing standing waves between the glass and thus sound leakes

As an option you may place absorbers on the flanks between the glass. Strong waves which still penatrate the windows will be absorbed

You don't need to decouple the glass from the wood. But you do need the decouple the Two frames.
However you may rest the glass on a damper like cork. See detail image. This is not realy necessary but may help alot.

I will add an example image :

image.php

And one closeup:

image.php

Also importent is the location where you live.
Some types of glue or other materials have different names. For example the fiberwool 703 does not exists in the Netherland so you have to find other products.

About silica, it is wize to add some little bags underneath the absorbsers between the windows.
This way you grab the moister and it is not visible.

If you can add an image what you build so far we can answer your questions even beter

Oops:
I missed the first image.

The problem you have their is the frame,glass and second frame are too close togerher.
And with one single window the vibrations will set the glass in motion.

I'm just wondering how the internal construction looks like. Because i get the feeling that under the surface some things could be wrong and thus makimg the construction less functional.
But hey i can't see that right ;-)

Edit:

About the tickness of the wood. If it is only for the frame you can choose what you want. The glass is hanging in the construction so the frame is basicly just cosmetic




It's not about what you got to use ....    but how you use what you got...

[ Post last edited on 11/20/2014 at 00:01:40 ]

BroKen91

BroKen91

9 posts
New AFfiliate
3 Posted on 11/20/2014 at 02:07:16
Quote from ernest savage:
Questions:

1. The specific name of the "acoustic glue" I should use to seal the window? I see all kinds of references to acoustic glue, but no names. Green glue says it is NOT an adhesive, so can that be used?

2. Does my new wood need to be 2"s thick? Would 1" suffice? Should I use hardwood like Maple or Oak? I'm thinking only of sound transmission, as I will be painting the wood. MDF instead?

3. I'm pretty sure I need the mass load vinyl to separate the new window frame from existing wall, however, should I add mass load vinyl again, after the new frame and before the window sandwich? I have 1/8" mass load vinyl I could use as well.

4. Anything else I'm doing wrong?


I'm admittedly no expert but I'll try and help you up if I can.

1. 3M SUPER 7 Adhesive. I've often read that this is a very sticky spray-on adhesive and particularly useful for attaching acoustic foam to panels. This is a VERY sticky spray adhesive for attaching the acoustic foam to the panels. I'd imagine this would be a good approach.

2. IMHO 2" wood would perform much more adequately. 1" would be doable, so it depends on your definition of suffice. By that I mean, if you only have 1" available then you might as well use that as it's obviously better than nothing, but if you could manage to get 2" of a dense wood, definitely go with that.

3. Personally I think that would be overkill, but maybe someone with more experience than me could answer htis one

4. Looks like you're doin a great job, bud. Admittedly I don't have too much DIY experience with vocal isolation booths, but I do have experience in studios so take my advice with a grain of salt, but I think you will enjoy the benefits of your labor and will be happy with the end result, given what I see here.

Hope that helps :-D
Mike Levine

Mike Levine

1064 posts
AFicionado
4 Posted on 11/20/2014 at 09:51:21
As usual, I'm impressed with the knowledge of Audiofanzine members. Good job, posters. :bravo:
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