Gibson Les Paul Studio
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Gibson Les Paul Studio

Les Paul Studio, LP-Shaped Guitar from Gibson in the Les Paul series.

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All user reviews for the Gibson Les Paul Studio

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Average Score:4.2( 4.2/5 based on 76 reviews )
 32 reviews42 %
 32 reviews42 %
 4 reviews5 %
 3 reviews4 %
 3 reviews4 %
iamqman08/02/2011

iamqman's review"nice and dark"

Gibson Les Paul Studio
The ebony look on the Gibson Les Paul is a very classic look and one of the most recognizable colors that you would see on a Les Paul. I am not a fan of the look of this guitar. The Gibson Les Paul has such a unique soul and when you strike a note you just feel the resonance and vibe that can only be an LP. The black look is just too plain for me. I like the look of a Goldtop LP the best but many other like the vintage white and quilted top are some of the best looking Gibson's made. This black ebony just does't give me the look that I think matches the soul of a Gibson Les Paul.

Les Paul Studio Features:

* Color: Ebony
* Top: Carved maple
* Back: Mahogany
* Neck: Mahogany with 1959 rounded profile
* Fingerboard: Rosewood with pearloid trapezoid inlays
* Number of frets: 22
* Pickups: Two humbucking pickups with Alnico magnets
* Controls: Two each tone and volume with three-way pickup selector switch
* Machine heads: Green Keys
* Hardware: Chrome plated

UTILIZATION

Detail
Body Material Mahogany
Top Material Maple
Body Finish Nitrocellulose
Color Ebony
Neck Material Mahogany, Set
Neck Shape '59 Rounded
Scale Length 24-3/4"
Fingerboard Material Rosewood, 12" Radius
Fingerboard Inlay Pearloid Trapezoids
Number of Frets 22
Nut Width 1-11/16"
Bridge/Tailpiece Tune-O-Matic/Stop Bar
Tuners Grover Green Keys
Number of Pickups 2
Neck Pickup 490R Alnico Humbucker
Middle Pickup No middle pickup
Bridge Pickup 498T Alnico Humbucker
Controls 2 x Volume, 2 x Tone, 3-way Pickup Toggle
Case Included Hardshell

SOUNDS

The tone on these guitars don't vary too much. The ebony won't sound any different than the alpine white or the faded cherry, but these guitars do vary in feel from one another. I can't tell you how many times I have walked into a music shop and pickup about 5 or 6 Gibson Les Paul's and each one feels completely different from one another. That is the problem with buying a Les Paul is that so many other them sound good and so many of them feel good but getting one to sound good and feel good can be a task. I would never buy this guitar or any other Gibson Les Paul off the internet or without playing it first. Each one comes of the production line a little different from the one before it. So I wold suggest playing the guitar first before you buy. So many guitar hit the classifieds very quickly form people blind buying these guitars. There are enough of these guitars out there to try before you buy.

OVERALL OPINION

You can pick these guitars up new for right around $1320, which isn't a bad price for a new Gibson Les Paul. These guitars are very good entry point for a Gibson Les Paul. The custom will cost more than double this price and the standards will cost at least double the price of this guitar. So this will get you into the game. Still not cheap but other than the faded version that cost $799 this is the only way to go.
iamqman08/02/2011

iamqman's review"Alpine Skiiing"

Gibson Les Paul Studio
If you are in the market for a Gibson Les Paul Studio then you want to spend as least as you can to get that Les Paul tone. If you absolutely need a color then you will pay almost double the price. If you don't care what the look of this guitar is, then I would suggest the faded version which come in right at around $799. Where the painted ones come in at $1300+. This is a player's guitar and at this price it is still good for a Gibson Les Paul.


Gibson Les Paul Studio Solid body Electric Guitar Features:


* Carved maple top over a mahogany body gives you authentic Les Paul sound and feel
* '50s-profile mahogany neck with luscious ebony fingerboard plays like butter
* Two Alnico magnet humbuckers give you original PAF tone, with a slight upper-midrange boost
* Pearloid trapezoid inlays give your Les Paul Studio that authentic LP vibe
* Durable Nitro finish feels great and gives your axe stunning good looks
* Crafted by Gibson in the USA

UTILIZATION

Details
Body Material Mahogany
Top Material Maple
Body Finish Nitrocellulose
Color Alpine White
Neck Material Mahogany, Set
Neck Shape '59 Rounded
Scale Length 24-3/4"
Fingerboard Material Rosewood, 12" Radius
Fingerboard Inlay Pearloid Trapezoids
Number of Frets 22
Nut Width 1-11/16"
Bridge/Tailpiece Tune-O-Matic/Stop Bar
Tuners Grover Green Keys
Number of Pickups 2
Neck Pickup 490R Alnico Humbucker
Middle Pickup No middle pickup
Bridge Pickup 498T Alnico Humbucker
Controls 2 x Volume, 2 x Tone, 3-way Pickup Toggle
Case Included Hardshell

SOUNDS

These necks are pretty beefy. So if you like the feel of the 50's neck or just a thick neck then you will jive with the feel of this guitar. I prefer the feel of a Gibson Les Paul with the 60's profile style neck. So this neck is a little too much for my hands but its is still a good feeling guitar. I love the way the Gibson Les Paul feels and dos even though I am partial to the 60's neck I still like the feel of this guitar.

The tone of this guitar is very nice like most Les Pauls. This guitar is chambered which I hate and fee it is a cheap out for Gibson to make guitars with a sub standard built quality. I think Les Pauls sound the n=best with a Marshall voiced amp. I love the way they feel and respond to the voicing of a Plexi or an 800 style amp. They just blend perfectly together.

OVERALL OPINION

At new you can pick these guitars up right at around $1320, which is a great price for a Gibson Les Paul. I would suggest getting the faded studios ans they come in at around $799. So you will save a good chunk of money of you don't mind the bare wood look. This is a cool looking guitar with the white alpine look. I love white LP's as they just have a cool vibe to the paint job.
Hatsubai07/15/2011

Hatsubai's review"Solid guitars for the money"

Gibson Les Paul Studio
The Les Paul Studio is always one of those guitars that a lot of people tend to stay away from as it lacks the true construction that a normal Les Paul has. I tend to agree, but these are still pretty solid, especially for their used prices. The guitar features a mahogany body, mahogany neck with a rosewood fretboard, 22 frets, trapezoid inlays, pickguard, no binding, hard tail bridge, two humbuckers, two volumes, two tones and a three way switch.

UTILIZATION

These guitars seem to be built fairly nice, but I experienced some fretwork issues on a few that were in the store. Gibson still has some QC issues, so you really need to play all of these before ultimately buying them. The good thing is that they were all fairly resonant sounding. That means that any fretwork issues or nut issues can usually be corrected by a competent luthier without too much of a hassle.


SOUNDS

This guitar actually had EMGs installed in it, so I'll be going by those instead of the standard pickups. The guitar had an EMG 81 in the bridge and an EMG 85 in the neck. The 81 in the bridge sounded thick, but it had enough bite to cut through without a problem. It worked awesome for metal tones; in fact, it was crushing. I was really surprised how nice it sounded. The 85 in the neck was super thick and worked awesome for those legato and shred leads. The clean tones were pretty awful on these, but that's fairly typical with EMGs. However, since it's geared towards metal, the clean tone doesn't really matter that much.

OVERALL OPINION

If you swap the pickups in these models, you can get a super fat sounding guitar. It won't have that top end sparkle that the normal Les Paul has, but some people like the darker tone of the all mahogany models. It really depends on what you're going for, but I find that these can be pretty solid if you find one used in good condition. Just be sure to check the frest and nut as those'll be your biggest issue.
Hatsubai07/15/2011

Hatsubai's review"Solid guitars for the money"

Gibson Les Paul Studio
The Les Paul Studio is always one of those guitars that a lot of people tend to stay away from as it lacks the true construction that a normal Les Paul has. I tend to agree, but these are still pretty solid, especially for their used prices. The guitar features a mahogany body, mahogany neck with a rosewood fretboard, 22 frets, trapezoid inlays, pickguard, no binding, hard tail bridge, two humbuckers, two volumes, two tones and a three way switch.

UTILIZATION

These guitars seem to be built fairly nice, but I experienced some fretwork issues on a few that were in the store. Gibson still has some QC issues, so you really need to play all of these before ultimately buying them. The good thing is that they were all fairly resonant sounding. That means that any fretwork issues or nut issues can usually be corrected by a competent luthier without too much of a hassle.


SOUNDS

This guitar actually had EMGs installed in it, so I'll be going by those instead of the standard pickups. The guitar had an EMG 81 in the bridge and an EMG 85 in the neck. The 81 in the bridge sounded thick, but it had enough bite to cut through without a problem. It worked awesome for metal tones; in fact, it was crushing. I was really surprised how nice it sounded. The 85 in the neck was super thick and worked awesome for those legato and shred leads. The clean tones were pretty awful on these, but that's fairly typical with EMGs. However, since it's geared towards metal, the clean tone doesn't really matter that much.

OVERALL OPINION

If you swap the pickups in these models, you can get a super fat sounding guitar. It won't have that top end sparkle that the normal Les Paul has, but some people like the darker tone of the all mahogany models. It really depends on what you're going for, but I find that these can be pretty solid if you find one used in good condition. Just be sure to check the frest and nut as those'll be your biggest issue.
tjon90107/07/2011

tjon901's review"Stripped down Les Paul"

Gibson Les Paul Studio
Everyone knows what a Les Paul is. The Les Paul guitar has been an icon in the guitar world for nearly 60 years now. The shape is a classic shape and the design is timeless. There have been countless version of the Les Paul released. Many are short lived but there are a few variations that Gibson has decided to make regular. The Les Paul Studio has been a common model for the last 20 or so years. The Les Paul Studio is a no frills version of the Les Paul. The guitar is pretty much a Les Paul Standard without any extras. There is no binding anywhere to be found. Most models come with a rosewood fretboard but some have ebony which I do not understand. They have 22 frets with trapezoid inlays now. They use to come with dot inlays. The neck is the baseball bat 50s style. It comes with standard gibson 490R and 498T pickups. It has the standard Les Paul control layout with a volume and tone for teach pickup and a 3 way switch.

UTILIZATION

No frills reaches into the area of playability also. With the 50s style neck some players might have some problems. They have put the 50s profile Gibson neck on this guitar so the neck is huge. People call the 50s profile neck the baseball bat neck. This may make it hard for some people with smaller hands to play. Because of the set neck design there is a large neck tenon and joint. This can make the upper frets hard for some people to reach because the body essentially joins the neck at the 17th fret. After the 17th fret you are reaching around the body to get to the frets. Because there is no binding the guitar will be more likely to have sharp fret edges when you first get it. This guitar is a lot lighter than most Les Pauls due to it being chambered. This means they cut wood out from the inside of the guitar so it is almost like a semi-hollow. If you x-rayed the guitar it would look like it was made out of swiss cheese with little circles cut out of it. Gibson still isnt putting locking bridges on their guitars. When you change strings the bridge can come off because it is held on by string tension. If this happens make sure you put it on the right way because you can put it on backwards and your intonation will be horribly off. When this happens your guitar will sound in tune on the open strings but any chords you play will sound off. Companies like ESP have been putting locking tune-o-matic bridges on their guitars for years.

SOUNDS

Being a low end Gibson it has the generic Gibson pickups. These pickups are not anything special. With the chambering the natural tone of the guitar is really effected. You can compare a chambered Les Paul to a non chambered Les Paul and you can really hear the difference. A non chambered Les Paul will sound more solid. The mahogany wood give the guitar a really deep sound even though the body is not that big. If you want to play heavier music you may want to change out the pickups. The Gibson pickups are medium output and are voiced more for classic rock. Putting in some Classic 57s would be okay if you want to keep it all Gibson but I recommend some Seymour Duncan pickups for a guitar like this.

OVERALL OPINION

This guitar sells for about 800 dollars. At that low a price there are better guitars out there if you are not just buying it for the Gibson logo on the headstock. A high end Epiphone which would be about 100 dollars less is just as good if not better than this guitar. The money you save getting the high end Epiphone you can put towards some nice pickups and you would have a much better guitar then. You can find some Edwards guitars for this cheap and they would also be much better since they are non chambered and come with aftermarket pickups and ebony fretboards stock. If you are looking for a cheap Les Paul and it has to be a Gibson they dont get much cheaper than this.
Hatsubai06/28/2011

Hatsubai's review"The budget Gibson"

Gibson Les Paul Studio
The Gibson Les Paul Studio is generally the guitar that people first buy when they get into Gibsons. The guitar features a mahogany body with a mahogany neck and rosewood fretboard, 22 frets, tune-o-matic bridge, two humbuckers, two volumes, two tones, a pickguard, trapezoid inlays and a three way switch.

UTILIZATION

I generally find these have the most iffy fretwork out of the entire Gibson lineup. They're generally crowned decently, but how level they are and how much the edges stick out really depends on how the luthiers were feeling at the time of day the guitar was made. The guitars also can exhibit some nut binding issues, too. If your guitar has any of these issues, you'll want to go ahead and have a lutheir do a fret level and redo the nut. That should make the guitar play like butter. Aside from that, the guitar is pretty much a standard Gibson Les Paul minus the maple top.

SOUNDS

The guitars generally sound darker and thicker than a normal Les Paul. They're also somewhat lighter due to the lack of a maple top. The bridge pickup is decent, but I find they're very medium output. This can prevent you from really dialing in a good metal tone if you're into that. The neck pickups are kinda bright for me. I'm a fan of really dark and smooth neck pickup tones, and I don't really like Gibson pickups for that kind of tone. If you're going to replace them, I recommend something like the JB/59 combo. That should really make the guitar scream and come alive.

OVERALL OPINION

If you're looking for a cheaper Gibson, get an Edwards, Burny, Tokai or something like that. You'll be much better off than buying one of these. The quality is iffy on these, they don't sound like a normal Les Paul and they lack some of the ascetics that a normal one would have.
glassjaw703/20/2011

glassjaw7's review"A stripped-down, iconic tone machine...though it doesn't stay in tune"

Gibson Les Paul Studio
The Gibson Les Paul is an icon in the music world. One of the most popular guitars of all time, the classic solidbody shape is equally at home in rock, country, pop, metal, blues and just about every other genre of music.

The Studio model (mine dates from 1995) is Gibson stripped down offering of the popular Les Paul. It doesn't have a figured top or fancy binding on the body, but it delivers all the Gibson tone!

It came equipped with two Gibson alnico humbuckers: a 498t in the bridge and a 490 in the neck position.
These pups deliver a classic "PAF on steroids" tone and feel and are constructed with Alnico V magnets which give them a muscular, yet classic tone.

The body is crafted of mahogany with a plain maple cap, and the glued-in neck is mahogany with a rosewood fingerboard and "trapezoid" pearl inlays.

Standard fixed, stop tailpiece bridge, dual humbuckers with three way pup selector, and 4 knobs (two volume, two tone) are some of the features on this classy instrument. There is no coil-tap option.

UTILIZATION

Upon delivery of the Studio, my initial thoughts on it's playability were just, well...meh. It felt a bit stiff and the intonation was off. I took it to my guitar teacher (I was young and didn't know how to set up an axe yet;) and he lowered the action, adjusted the pickup height, and fixed the slight intonation issue. Now this guitar played pretty nicely. It took me a little while to get used to the neck thickness and the shorter 24 3/4" scale as I had been playing a strat and a Jackson "super-strat" guitar with thinner necks and 25 1/2" scale, but once I got used to the thick neck I loved how it felt. To this day I prefer a wider 50's style neck.

The guitar does have some clumsy feeling qualities and attributes, which I'll get into later...

SOUNDS

This is why you buy a Les Paul; the SOUND!!! Nothing sounds like a Les Paul. Its thick singing sustain and full clean tones are to die for!

The 498T alnico pup in the bridge delivers a very good tone for rock, blues and some metal. Though with the body's thickness and weight, I feel that a slightly underwound design, or maybe an Alnico II based pup would be more appropriate. Don't get me wrong, this thing sounds phenomenal on cleans and sings on leads, but it sounds just the slightest bit congested. A more "airy" pickup would benefit this guitar, but the stock pups are not bad at all. In fact they are great and would probably sound amazing in a thinner bodied guitar, like an SG or a lighter, thinner Les Paul.

OVERALL OPINION

Now for some negative qualities. For all that great LP tone, you unfortunately must sacrifice some playability. The vintage style Gibson tuners are absolutely AWFUL!!! There's no excuse for how poor these tuners are, and it's not just me who feels this way. It's widely known that Les Pauls do not stay in tune well. If you are a lead player who likes to bend notes on the G, B and E strings, you MUST change tuners and possibly the nut as well (I replaced both) in order to stay in tune, and even then for some reason, the guitar still isn't completely stable.

I don't understand why Gibson doesn't use locking tuners and self-lubricating nuts. Some models come stock with Grovers, which are a huge improvement, but still not as stable as locking tuners.

For the price you pay for a Gibson, you should get quality parts and features that are superior to other lower and equally priced instruments, but that's just not the case. I've played $400 dollar Schecters and ESP LTD guitars that stay in tune perfectly after having been dropped or thrown across the stage (seriously) and the Gibson goes out of tune if you look at it wrong...not cool. Carvin is another example of perfect tuning stability in an inexpensive instrument. What are you doing GIbson???

All in all, I'd have to recommend this guitar, only because I feel every guitarist should own a Les Paul, just as every one should own a strat. Only a Les Paul can deliver the thick singing tones that they made famous. The bad part is that if you want this guitar to play as well as it sounds, you have to do some modifying, which is unfortunate because the cost of the guitar is already high and should include quality parts. It's a love/hate thing...
mooseherman01/26/2010

mooseherman's review

Gibson Les Paul Studio
The Gibson Les Paul is an American Classic. The guitar has the classic Gibson set up, two humbucker pickups, a volume and tone knob for each, and a switch in the upper left corner for switching. The guitar has 21 frets, a tune-o-matic bridge, a mahogany neck and a rosewood fingerboard (typically).

UTILIZATION

I am in the minority when it comes to these guitars in that I do actually think that the weight and neck positioning are a hindrance. Being used to lighter Fenders, I can't stand and play my friends' Les Paul Studio without really getting tired after awhile. Having a thicker strap, as another reviewer mentioned, does help this problem, and of course experience will make it easier on just about anyone, but the guitar is a really heavy beast. And the last frets, especially on lower strings, are much harder to reach than most guitars I'm used to. Getting a nice sound, however, is generally a snap, as long as you're a fan of what a Les Paul can do (which is a lot!). I also think that the guitar is one of the smoother guitars I've played, which is saying a lot. Plays like a dream.

SOUNDS

I use it through a Fender Twin mostly, but when I get the chance, I play it through a Marshall stack or combo with built-in Marshall Distortion. This and other quality tube high-gain amps are where this thing really kicks as far as I'm concerned. The sheer power of a good distortion pedal and Les Paul is untouchable by Fender and most other companies, no question about it. While leads don't have the high-end that I can get with my Strat or Tele, and thus aren't as bright, they have enough midrange and level to cut through just about any kind of muck and noise. This is invaluable when playing with a loud band, as lighter sounds aren't able to be heard above the rhythm. Beyond my obvious preference, the distorted, rocking sounds, the clean tone is also quite phenomenal, though not always what I prefer. I have heard rock players use this guitar in this context with good results, almost emulating the hollow-body sound though with a slightly less warm result. The result is definitely a thick, fatter tone that's great for lighter rock stuff, while still being able to kick it with a good lead sound. I'd have to be honest and say that the sound is less appealing to me than my Strat, and not as versatile as my Tele, but without a doubt it is more powerful and louder.

OVERALL OPINION

I know that this guitar is perfect for many guitarists, as so many people prefer a good Les Paul to any other guitar. I personally think this is one of the more perfect Les Pauls. Contrary to what many of my naive friends say, Epiphone Les Pauls really don't hold a candle to Gibsons, and most Gibsons aren't as good as this model. Getting one at a good price is a steal, so get on Craigslist and look away. Be wary of a suspiciously low price in the stores, especially the bigger ones. They are probably trying to sell you on a sub-par product. The sound and feel of a great Les Paul is a treat, no doubt about it.
moosers04/20/2009

moosers's review

Gibson Les Paul Studio
The Gibson Les Paul Studio is made in the USA and is truly one of the best guitars ever made. It has two pick ups with tone and volume knobs for each, as well as a switch to choose between the pick ups. It's a basic set up, but one that has been copied over and over again.

UTILIZATION

The neck of the Gibson Les Paul Studio is extremely fluid and the guitar is very easy to play. It is easy to play all around the neck, including the top notes, which makes it easy to rip solos high up on the neck. The guitar isn't extremely light, but isn't all that heavy either. It is very easy to get a good sound from the Gibson Les Paul Studio, and the tones are pretty versatile to boot.

SOUNDS

The Gibson Les Paul Studio is great for pretty much any type of music, but excels in rock and pop music. I usually plug this guitar into a '76 Fender Twin Reverb amp, but it will really sound great no matter what amp you are using and will also sound good either clean or with some overdrive or other effects. Overall, an awesome sounding guitar that has a tone all of its own.

OVERALL OPINION

I've been using the Gibson Les Paul Studio for about five years and all of the hype about how great this guitar is is definitely true. I love the sustain and full bodied sound that I get with this guitar, whether it be for recording or for live shows. The Gibson Les Paul Studio isn't cheap, but it is designed for professionals who want the best guitar they can get. Even though it is expensive, it is still attainable for the serious musician. Overall, the Gibson Les Paul Studio is a classic guitar that every guitarist should try out.
Audiofanzine FR03/08/2009

Audiofanzine FR's review

Gibson Les Paul Studio
(Originally written by sublime-sk71/translated from Audiofanzine FR)
Made in the USA.

Tune-o-matic bridge

3-way toggle switch

Les Paul-type neck.

UTILIZATION

Very pleasant neck, even though it's not that fast.

Access to the upper frets isn't easy.

Very good playability. The guitar is not heavy at all (it's a recent Les Paul Studio model... forget models made in the late 90's).

You'll easily get a good sound.

SOUNDS

It's great for my music style (blues rock).

But you can also get a bluesy and jazzy or even a very fat sound.

OVERALL OPINION

Yes, I would buy it again even though it's expensive. Gibson uses its name to sell expensive guitars, which could have a better finish and a better hardware (the tune-o-matic bridge is not very practical when you change the strings...).