Become a member
Become a member

or
Continue with Google
Log in
Log in

or
Log in using a Google account
Add this product to
  • Mon ancien matos
  • My current gear
  • My wishlist
GHS Guitar Boomers Zakk Wylde Signature
Images
1/3

All user reviews for the GHS Guitar Boomers Zakk Wylde Signature

Guitar String from GHS belonging to the Guitar Boomers series.

Not satisfied with those reviews?
Filter
Keywords
Average Score:
( 5/5 based on 6 reviews )
5 reviews
83 %
Write a user review
Users reviews
  • GHS Boomers perfect for drop tuning

    GHS Guitar Boomers Zakk Wylde SignaturePublished on 08/06/12 at 23:21
    The GHS Boomer Zakk Wylde strings come in 10-60 gauge to accommodate modern down tunings ala Black Label Society and other heavy modern guitar sounds. I wasn't sure what to expect with these but I knew I couldn't go on with tuning the Low E to a B and having basically a thin rubber band as my low string.

    The GHS Zakk Boomers solved that problem and provide a hybrid set of strings that allows you to enjoy the gauge up top that you can still bend with ease but still have the chunk down low of a thick string and thus a thick sound. The 60 on the bottom is a bit hard to get used to depending on what you are used to but I found it a bit of a learning curve. My fingers had to......
    Read more
    The GHS Boomer Zakk Wylde strings come in 10-60 gauge to accommodate modern down tunings ala Black Label Society and other heavy modern guitar sounds. I wasn't sure what to expect with these but I knew I couldn't go on with tuning the Low E to a B and having basically a thin rubber band as my low string.

    The GHS Zakk Boomers solved that problem and provide a hybrid set of strings that allows you to enjoy the gauge up top that you can still bend with ease but still have the chunk down low of a thick string and thus a thick sound. The 60 on the bottom is a bit hard to get used to depending on what you are used to but I found it a bit of a learning curve. My fingers had to callace up a bit before I could be truly comfortable. Once that happened, these were a great solution to playing modern rock and accommodating modern drop tuning. As with all GHS strings, my experience has been exceptional and I have had few problems. I have never broken a GHS string at a gig when I change them often. As a matter a fact I have only ever had one failure period on a low E right out of the pack. This was obviously an anomaly.

    I would also suggest getting the 11-60 set for certain applications. Speed metal is a great genre for this set as there is very little lead work and when there is it relies on little bending technique. This set is durable and can withstand a pounding. Whichever set you choose, I highly suggest you try these out if you have the need. They are not a good choice for playing classic rock or even 80s. I would also suggest not putting these on a trem guitar that is typically set up for 9s. Trust me you will need to add a spring or two to the trem to keep it at center, trust me I tried! Stick to a good solid body Les Paul or something similar and these can be a great tool and perfect for down tuning.
    See less
  • Thunderous tone, but at what cost?

    GHS Guitar Boomers Zakk Wylde SignaturePublished on 04/21/12 at 12:49
    In 1985 I started playing with heavy picks and light strings 9-42. By 2002, I changed to light picks and heavy strings, the ZW 10-60.

    I have a Gibson Gothic Studio Les Paul from 2001. I saw Black Label Society in a local bar supporting the disc Stronger than Death. The venue was small as the band was not yet established; I was right up front to watch Zakk belt out awesome tone...I was immediately driven to acquire such a lethal, brutal, and clear sound.
    I slapped these 10-60 strings on my Les Paul.

    At first, I played in standard E with lots of drop D tuning; eventually I went down to standard D# with lots of drop C#. I stayed there for about 5 years, then settled into standard D/dropC.
    Read more
    In 1985 I started playing with heavy picks and light strings 9-42. By 2002, I changed to light picks and heavy strings, the ZW 10-60.

    I have a Gibson Gothic Studio Les Paul from 2001. I saw Black Label Society in a local bar supporting the disc Stronger than Death. The venue was small as the band was not yet established; I was right up front to watch Zakk belt out awesome tone...I was immediately driven to acquire such a lethal, brutal, and clear sound.
    I slapped these 10-60 strings on my Les Paul.

    At first, I played in standard E with lots of drop D tuning; eventually I went down to standard D# with lots of drop C#. I stayed there for about 5 years, then settled into standard D/dropC.

    The tonal value was increased dramatically for heavy hi gain rhythm riffing. I went from wondering where Zakk got that tone to being immersed- all due to the string gauge. lighter/medium gauges just don't cut it- not enough power and too much floppiness. The heavier gauge really provides a tight modern metal sound. Lead tones ooze with fullness and quality. I play with an aggressive approach, so adjusting to the thickness was not a big challenge- it actually kept my vibrato in check and prevented the over bending I usually wander into with lighter strings.

    But there is a huge negative side...all these years, I tried to set my guitars up on my own. I'm no expert, but I understand the basic mechanics of intonation, string adjustment, truss rod, etc. But I couldn't get my Les Paul into proper intonation. The band I was in played a lot of straight ahead pop/punk/rock, so I basically tuned for the song I was playing. A few times I played with other people and attempted to play larger 6 string and jazzier chords- the intonation was so awful it made it impossible. I finally brought my guitar in for a pro setup.

    The luthier- well respected in the area and works with top pros- said that the guitar would not ever be intonated properly with these strings, unless I was willing to drill new holes. I believed this to be accurate due to my own explorations into not having enough room on the adjustments for intonation. Instead, I choose to go with 10-52 gauge and that solved the problem. Now the guitar plays like a dream!

    I asked how Zakk can do this, and the reply was that Zakk probably has a fleet of techs making custom adjustments. Bottom line, I have about 50 packs of these 10-60 in storage; while I love the tone, it looks like they are going to eBay.

    Yes, I miss the bold thick strings, but 10-52 is not too far away, and I do not wish to drill new holes. Knowing what I know now, I would NOT buy again.
    See less
  • GHS Guitar Boomers Zakk Wylde SignaturePublished on 12/19/04 at 04:21
    (This content has been automatically translated from French)
    To all those looking for a man of Wylde, first try these strings from GHS distos moult before testing and chorus.
    Dj I used on my Les Paul D'addario of a good firing -10/52- trs that were good and solid.
    I took them Pigalle -8 euros-per curiosities ... and there's no picture! Severe standards but net, comfort respect (even when it is necessary to get used to playing in the middle in 52 and 60 ...)
    a password even in the clear.
    A try without fear ... if appprcie Obviously this type of sound.
  • GHS Guitar Boomers Zakk Wylde SignaturePublished on 11/21/05 at 09:12
    (This content has been automatically translated from French)
    After trying several different brand of string and tie, I finally found the strings that I had with the GHS.
    C # tuning with a drop in (B) GHS BOOMERS 10-60 GBZW are ideal for both highlighting strong agreements for serious solos on the latest round of boxes.
    The price differs somewhat depending on where you buy them (for some reason ...); so I could find at a high price to 10 euros as at the best price to 7.50 euros.
    So if you are looking for quality strings to play the big metal very heavy I can only advise them;)
  • GHS Guitar Boomers Zakk Wylde SignaturePublished on 12/15/05 at 02:36
    (This content has been automatically translated from French)
    I mount these strings yesterday.
    This is good ropes .036 .052 .060 in severe and acute normal .010 .013 .017.
    I used to play on top of light in the bottom of Heavy addario so the same in acute and grave .030 .042 .052, silent attaches the problem in D when you attack a frieze s ERV.
    The Zakk Wilde is nickel. The power chord reflected great (especially palm mute) and in acute bend out naturally without forcing a do.
    Report qualitprix ... GHS and is 3.66 at Thomann ... that could be better?
    And of course I would do the same choice.
  • A Beefy setup

    GHS Guitar Boomers Zakk Wylde SignaturePublished on 07/11/11 at 21:24
    The GHS Zakk Wylde Signature boomer strings were my preferred set of strings for as long as I could get them. When I was playing very intensely my primary tuning was D and the more tension I could get on my low strings the better. When I was a little kid I remember stareing at the Zakk Wylde GHS adds in magazines and marveling at how thick his low E string was. Playing these I can appreciate having good tension on the low strings. I can handle light strings for every other string but if my low E is too floppy I cant play at all. I will be pushing it out of tune constantly. This is a problem I have often when trying out different guitars that are not my own personal guitars. I used these......
    Read more
    The GHS Zakk Wylde Signature boomer strings were my preferred set of strings for as long as I could get them. When I was playing very intensely my primary tuning was D and the more tension I could get on my low strings the better. When I was a little kid I remember stareing at the Zakk Wylde GHS adds in magazines and marveling at how thick his low E string was. Playing these I can appreciate having good tension on the low strings. I can handle light strings for every other string but if my low E is too floppy I cant play at all. I will be pushing it out of tune constantly. This is a problem I have often when trying out different guitars that are not my own personal guitars. I used these strings in just about every tuning. Being 10 – 60 gauge they are the ultimate in light top heavy bottom. I used these strings in everything E standard to drop B. Like I said the tension on the other strings does not bother me just the low E. GHS strings to me feel like they are slightly a heavier gauge than other strings. I feel like a GHS 10 is bigger than an Ernie Ball 10 or another companies 10. The shop I got these at stopped selling them and I had to start buying 7 string sets to get my low E tension. Even then the low E was only a 52. That will tell you how crazy the Zakk Wylde set is when it comes to the low E. With that super thick low E you may need to file out some space on your nut to get it to sit properly but once your guitar is setup for the 60 it rings like crazy. Whatever tuning you do there is always good natural twang from the string and you get it nice and clear through your amp. If you are looking for the heaviest set of 6 strings you can find this is a good option if your hands are strong enough.
    See less
cookies

We are using cookies!

Yes, Audiofanzine is using cookies. Since the last thing that we want is disturbing your diet with too much fat or too much sugar, you'll be glad to learn that we made them ourselves with fresh, organic and fair ingredients, and with a perfect nutritional balance. What this means is that the data we store in them is used to enhance your use of our website as well as improve your user experience on our pages (learn more). To configure your cookie preferences, click here.

We did not wait for a law to make us respect our members and visitors' privacy. The cookies that we use are only meant to improve your experience on our website.

Our cookies

Cookies not subject to consent

These are cookies that guarantee the proper functioning of Audiofanzine and allow its optimization. The website cannot function properly without these cookies.

Website preferences

We store your preferences so that you do not have to re-enter them every time your come back (forums options, dark or light theme, classifieds filter, standard or buzz news, newsletters popups...).

Log in

This one makes sure you don't have to re-enter your credentials every time you visit Audiofanzine.

Analytics

This data allows us to understand the use that our visitors make of our website in an attempt to improve it.

Advertising

This information allows us to show you personalized advertisements thanks to which Audiofanzine is financed. By unchecking this box you will still have advertisements but they may be less interesting :)

We did not wait for a law to make us respect our members and visitors' privacy. The cookies that we use are only meant to improve your experience on our website.

Our cookies

Cookies not subject to consent

These are cookies that guarantee the proper functioning of Audiofanzine and allow its optimization. The website cannot function properly without these cookies.

Website preferences

We store your preferences so that you do not have to re-enter them every time your come back (forums options, dark or light theme, classifieds filter, standard or buzz news, newsletters popups...).

Log in

This one makes sure you don't have to re-enter your credentials every time you visit Audiofanzine.

Analytics

This data allows us to understand the use that our visitors make of our website in an attempt to improve it.

Advertising

This information allows us to show you personalized advertisements thanks to which Audiofanzine is financed. By unchecking this box you will still have advertisements but they may be less interesting :)


You can find more details on data protection in our privacy policy.