Become a member
Become a member

or
Log in
Log in

or
learning
2 comments

Basic Guitar Chords

Guitar essentials for writing songs and playing with other musicians

Some people may just want to learn the basic guitar chords to impress girls (or boys) on the beach or to modestly accompany themselves when singing. Whatever your reasons, here are some basic chords in case you already play another instrument or even if you are a true beginner ─ no complicated music theory involved!

I will survive!

Learning chords just like that isn’t very exciting, so I suggest you follow a chord progression that has a proven record for being rich and effective by many composers, as The Ukulele Orchestra Of Great Britain can attest.

 

Before moving on, you should know that guitar strings are usually tuned to E – B – G – D – A – E, from bottom to top, and they are numbered 1 to 6, also from bottom to top (thinnest to thickest).

At your fingertips

Strictly speaking, there are no such things as “standard” chords. Contrary to the “academic” position with the wrist slightly arched ─ a position that will be mandatory for barre chords ─ the goal here is to play with the palm of your hand around the neck.

A minor

We start right away with a small detail: When you play this chord, you don’t need to hear the lowest string. And you have two solutions to achieve that: You can simply avoid playing the string with your right hand (or left hand if you’re a lefty) or you can mute it some way or another, as you’ll see with the C Major chord.

D minor

You only have to play the bottom four strings. A very easy and easily rewarding chord.

G Major

Yet another easy-to-play chord that allows you to make the sound “fuller” by playing all the strings of the instrument.

C Major

In theory, the low E string shouldn’t be played, but you can place your little finger on the third fret to strum all the strings and still get it right.

There are two easy tricks to mute the unwanted low E: You can press on it slightly with your thumb or use the index finger to touch the upper string to dampen it.

F Major

Since all strings need to be pressed and you most probably don’t have six fingers, you’ll need to be crafty. Fortunately there’s the “thumb-over-the-top” technique, which allows you to play the low E while fretting the two bottom strings with the index finger, everything on the first fret.

Power B

If you are wondering what a power chord is, here’s an example. Only strings 3, 4 and 5 are played, to give the chord more power, at the expense of harmonic richness. A very easy and indispensable fingering that you can move all along the neck.

E Major

To close the loop we have the lowest basic chord on a guitar (with a standard tuning), namely E Major, which uses all the strings.

Here’s a brief example of how all these chords sound like one after the other with a folk guitar:

00:0000:00

Barre chords

Even if they sound different, barre chords allow you to play the same chords that we just saw. Here’s the evidence in pictures:

A minor barre chord

Let’s start with the simplest voicing, an A minor, which ─ as all barre chords ─ can be played all along the neck to get any minor “standard” chord. Here I show you a technique to train your fingers and support the index with the middle finger.

D minor barre chord

Another classic chord that can be used under all circumstances and which can be transposed moving at will along the neck. The low E string shouldn’t be played if it isn’t damped.

G Major barre chord

It’s almost the same as the A minor, but this time, the middle finger plays the 3rd string, and it all happens two frets up…or an E Major displaced three frets to shorten the neck with the help of the index finger, depending on where you look at it from.

C Major barre chord

Another way to do major chords. It allows you to change chords without the need to change frets with your hand. Like with the D minor, the low E should remain silent.

F Major barre chord

You will surely notice that it’s the exact same chord as the one described above making use of the “thumb-over-the-top” technique, since the strings are fretted at the same frets. This chord can prove to be very painful when you start out. The only useful tip this time is to practice again and again…and again. 

B minor barre chord

It uses the same position as the D minor barre chord, but you can add a subtle detail by lifting just slightly your index finger to let the high E string vibrate. 

E7

Let’s finish with a loosening exercise: An E7 chord that you can strum at leisure to get a nice bluesy touch.

Plus, here you have a brief example of how all these chords sound with an electric guitar:

00:0000:00

 

  • holygrail 5 posts
    holygrail
    New AFfiliate
    Posted on 09/23/2014 at 02:52:29
    I must say I was surprised to read an article about basic chords....I understand the need to cater to utter beginners (which I don't believe we are on AF....) but this is excessively elementary. Anyone who wants to learn basic chords just googles them and sees tabs. A paragraph per chord is borderline useless. I would have mentioned the CAGED method to truly help beginners who might not know about it, instead.

    Having said that, I've played guitar for several years now, and still for the life of me can ONLY bar chords that aren't open. I can't use my thumb to hold down the low E (and A, if necessary) cleanly. I don't know if it's because my thumb is too fat, too short, too skinny, or if my joints are messed up or what, but it always, even after all these years, feels like my thumb is about to break off, and even THEN I still don't get a clean sound.....what gives?!? It's not like my guitar's neck is thick by any stretch of the imagination. Any tips? I don't understand how guitarists out there can wrap all thumbs and fingers around a guitar neck like it's a newborn baby's wrists, yet I can't do this even after years of trying :furieux::furieux:

    case in point: JimmyPage197506.jpg
  • Mike Levine 1066 posts
    Mike Levine
    Author
    Posted on 09/25/2014 at 10:56:12
    Quote:
    I must say I was surprised to read an article about basic chords....I understand the need to cater to utter beginners (which I don't believe we are on AF....) but this is excessively elementary.

    It's true that it was more basic than most of our material. Because we cater to all types of musicians, in addition to guitar players, so we thought it would be useful to provide a quick guide for those who play instruments other than guitar (or for beginning guitarists), to play some simple chords.

Would you like to comment this article?

Log in
Become a member
cookies
We are using cookies!

Yes, Audiofanzine is using cookies. Since the last thing that we want is disturbing your diet with too much fat or too much sugar, you'll be glad to learn that we made them ourselves with fresh, organic and fair ingredients, and with a perfect nutritional balance. What this means is that the data we store in them is used to enhance your use of our website as well as improve your user experience on our pages and show you personalised ads (learn more). To configure your cookie preferences, click here.

We did not wait for a law to make us respect our members and visitors' privacy. The cookies that we use are only meant to improve your experience on our website.

Our cookies
Cookies not subject to consent
These are cookies that guarantee the proper functioning of Audiofanzine and allow its optimization. The website cannot function properly without these cookies. Example: cookies that help you stay logged in from page to page or that help customizing your usage of the website (dark mode or filters).
Google Analytics
We are using Google Analytics in order to better understand the use that our visitors make of our website in an attempt to improve it.
Advertising
This information allows us to show you personalized advertisements thanks to which Audiofanzine is financed. By unchecking this box you will still have advertisements but they may be less interesting :) We are using Google Ad Manager to display part of our ads, or tools integrated to our own CMS for the rest. We are likely to display advertisements from our own platform, from Google Advertising Products or from Adform.

We did not wait for a law to make us respect our members and visitors' privacy. The cookies that we use are only meant to improve your experience on our website.

Our cookies
Cookies not subject to consent

These are cookies that guarantee the proper functioning of Audiofanzine. The website cannot function properly without these cookies. Examples: cookies that help you stay logged in from page to page or that help customizing your usage of the website (dark mode or filters).

Google Analytics

We are using Google Analytics in order to better understand the use that our visitors make of our website in an attempt to improve it. When this parameter is activated, no personal information is sent to Google and the IP addresses are anonymized.

Advertising

This information allows us to show you personalized advertisements thanks to which Audiofanzine is financed. By unchecking this box you will still have advertisements but they may be less interesting :) We are using Google Ad Manager to display part of our ads, or tools integrated to our own CMS for the rest. We are likely to display advertisements from our own platform, from Google Advertising Products or from Adform.


You can find more details on data protection in our privacy policy.
You can also find information about how Google uses personal data by following this link.