Log in
Log in

or
Create an account

or

Thread June 11, 2016 editorial: comments

  • 5 replies
  • 4 participants
  • 850 views
  • 4 followers
Topic June 11, 2016 editorial: comments

Is Jargon a Value Proposition?


For some reason, I’m hypersensitive to jargon words, and many of them grate on me big time. The corporate world, the place where people “grow businesses,” engage in “blamestorming,” and try to “disincentivize“ their rivals, is the epicenter of such babble. 


The combination of the internet and business has produced its share of whoppers. For me, the worst of them all is the word “Webinar.” My skin crawls every time I read or hear it. It’s probably an irrational response on my part, but there’s something about the unnatural way in which those two words were shoved together that makes it so annoying. Why not “web seminar,” or “online tutorial”? I guess some marketing person (a “guru” perhaps?) thought they’d get cutesy, and for some inexplicable reason, “webinar” caught on. 


If you want to have a little fun, go to the the Corporate Gibberish Generator. It’s a website that lets you type in any company name, after which it spews out a paragraph of businessese (uh oh, I just used a jargon word) that’s both incoherent and hilarious.


And of course, there’s email/texting jargon, which mainly consists of shorthand acronyms like LOL or BTW, or FYI. I must admit to using those fairly often, so it would be hypocritical of me to complain about them. However, when you get into the four- and five-letter ones, like YMMV (your mileage may vary) or BBIAS (be back in a second) or IANAL (I am not a lawyer), my jargon-detector starts to go off.


Like any industry, the recording world has its jargon, too. You can “squash” a track, “punch-in” a vocal line, cause a recording to “pump and breathe” due to over-compression, use a “gobo” to help reduce “bleed,” and “lose a generation” (didn’t that happen in World War I?) when mixing down in the analog domain, to name just a few. Maybe it’s because it’s my field of interest, but those terms don’t bug me the way many of the business-related ones do.


So there, I did the “heavy lifting” and the “hypertasking” and I was able to give you a “helicopter view” on the subject. So don’t be a “negatron,” and whatever you do, don’t “shoot the puppy,” “squeeze the sponge,” “pump and dump,” “punch the tree,” or take a “stall nap.” (Thanks to The Office Life website for its comprehensive jargon dictionary.)


 

[ Post last edited on 06/11/2016 at 10:42:10 ]

2
Amen Mike!

I consider it one of the biggest pieces of my job to demystify (ha!) the language associated with audio recording. I agree completely that not only has audio slang become part of the lexicon (ha! again) of audio recording, but the accepted technical terms are so often needlessly confusing.

Here's to making audio recording easier to understand for everyone. Or should I say: "more effectively orchestrate sympathetic comprehension of the typical parlance utilized overly casually by recording mavens.":-P

Cheers!

Ken Theriot

Home recording studio tips and tutorials

3
Don't forget about STM, meaning "Spank the Monkey"! ....that means....oops....sorry, wrong forum!
4
Hello Mike,

As a producer/artist I've subscribed to a lot of newsletters in the past...
And as they roll in, weekly or monthly, I must say , there is hardly any newsletter I actually read.
Most is just promotion or updates to software, whatever...
But every Saturday, or Sunday, I get yours...
I have the tendency to push the 'delete' button on any mail, but as soon as I start to read yours, I'm immediately interested in what you have written...
Why? I don't know, you immediately strike the right chords, and appeal to me.
You write articles as a musician, not a journalist or sales person, I love that!
You have interesting views, mostly about things I only think about because you bring them up.
Your newsletter makes me think.
That's great, and I wanna thank you for that.:bravo:
Keep it up!

Regards,
Stijn
BE

5
Quote:
You have interesting views, mostly about things I only think about because you bring them up.
Your newsletter makes me think.

Hi Stijn--Thank you very much for your kind words, they're much appreciated! :bravo:
6
Quote:
Here's to making audio recording easier to understand for everyone. Or should I say: "more effectively orchestrate sympathetic comprehension of the typical parlance utilized overly casually by recording mavens.":-P

Good one! :bravo: Your comment is a value add — one that all stakeholders should pay attention to. ;)