Become a member
Become a member

or
Log in
Log in

or
< Tous les avis Zvex Fuzz Factory Vertical
Add this product to
  • My former gear
  • My current gear
  • My wishlist
Zvex Fuzz Factory Vertical
Images
1/22
Zvex Fuzz Factory Vertical
MGR/Brian Johnston MGR/Brian Johnston

« Heavy grainy distortion to smooth velvety fuzz »

Published on 03/21/18 at 05:52
Value For Money : Correct
Audience: Anyone
SOUND:
The Fuzz Factory is one of those classic pedals that originally put ZVEX on the map. You can dial into some great distortion and fuzz tones, and even some freaky feedback if that’s up your alley. The YouTube demo below includes several settings, although I kept it more conservative and traditional.



Some of the functions are straight forward, such as the volume, gate and compression. Obviously you use the GATE to reduce any background noise (unless you want to hear added squeals and burps from the STAB (stability knob), and the COMPRESSION is excellent in pinching the tone or it can be used to smooth things out if you want a velvety sound. The DRIVE is very nice, in that you can achieve a gritty and dirty overdrive or distortion, more so than a fuzz quality… but turned all the way up and it sizzles very nicely while remaining clear in the mix. The drive also alters the tone, so that turned toward the left you get a deeper and thicker sound with more grain, whereas you get more clarity and treble when turned to the right. The STAB or stability controls the feedback pitch (low when turned left and high when turned right) – all the way right and it’s quiet as a mouse, but turn it left and past 2-o’clock and you can get some freaky results (that can be controlled or manipulated with the compression and gate).

The sound of this pedal is very much like other ZVEX pedals… it sounds like a ZVEX. There is something very raw and organic about this company’s analog equipment and with their own characteristics, and the Fuzz Factory is no exception. Some other fuzz pedals, even if analog, have a more processed sound, whereas you can hear every detail in the Fuzz Factory, like bacon slowly cooking in a cast iron frying pan.

OVERALL IMPRESSION:
Encased in steel, the Fuzz Factory has a metal foot switch (for on and off) and plastic knobs. The foot switch is far enough removed from the knobs that there shouldn’t be an issue of damage caused by stomping. The standard 9v power input is located at the back, whereas the input-output are located along the sides.

It’s interesting that a well-known gear reviewer on YouTube considered the Fuzz Factory to be in the top 10 worse pedals… ever! I can only hazard a guess that he did not control the feedback (from the STAB knob) by way of the compressor or gate… both of which can allow squeals and pops to trickle in, if desired, or become blatantly obnoxious (if you want to go that route). If you avoid the STAB all together you can some great thick distortion that transforms to a very fine and smooth fuzz… you then can get a very punchy effect with the compressor and, of course, have the signal super quiet with the gate. And so, I have no idea what the heck he did with the pedal when reviewing it.

EASE OF USE:
The Fuzz Factory is not difficult to use, but you will need to do some tweaking to discover how smooth, punchy or ‘wild’ you want the tone. Avoiding the STAB narrows your decisions and makes it easy to use, although some bubbles, burps and screeches in the mix certainly are fun and entertaining. There are no downfalls, unless you don’t like the particular tones of the Fuzz Factory… it does what it’s supposed to do and with very good versatility. It operate on a 9v battery, but also accepts a basic 9v power supply while consuming a paltry 3 mA.

Images linked to this review

  • photo
cookies
We are using cookies!

Yes, Audiofanzine is using cookies. Since the last thing that we want is disturbing your diet with too much fat or too much sugar, you'll be glad to learn that we made them ourselves with fresh, organic and fair ingredients, and with a perfect nutritional balance. What this means is that the data we store in them is used to enhance your use of our website as well as improve your user experience on our pages and show you personalised ads (learn more). To configure your cookie preferences, click here.

We did not wait for a law to make us respect our members and visitors' privacy. The cookies that we use are only meant to improve your experience on our website.

Our cookies
Cookies not subject to consent
These are cookies that guarantee the proper functioning of Audiofanzine and allow its optimization. The website cannot function properly without these cookies. Example: cookies that help you stay logged in from page to page or that help customizing your usage of the website (dark mode or filters).
Google Analytics
We are using Google Analytics in order to better understand the use that our visitors make of our website in an attempt to improve it.
Advertising
This information allows us to show you personalized advertisements thanks to which Audiofanzine is financed. By unchecking this box you will still have advertisements but they may be less interesting :) We are using Google Ad Manager to display part of our ads, or tools integrated to our own CMS for the rest. We are likely to display advertisements from our own platform, from Google Advertising Products or from Adform.

We did not wait for a law to make us respect our members and visitors' privacy. The cookies that we use are only meant to improve your experience on our website.

Our cookies
Cookies not subject to consent

These are cookies that guarantee the proper functioning of Audiofanzine. The website cannot function properly without these cookies. Examples: cookies that help you stay logged in from page to page or that help customizing your usage of the website (dark mode or filters).

Google Analytics

We are using Google Analytics in order to better understand the use that our visitors make of our website in an attempt to improve it. When this parameter is activated, no personal information is sent to Google and the IP addresses are anonymized.

Advertising

This information allows us to show you personalized advertisements thanks to which Audiofanzine is financed. By unchecking this box you will still have advertisements but they may be less interesting :) We are using Google Ad Manager to display part of our ads, or tools integrated to our own CMS for the rest. We are likely to display advertisements from our own platform, from Google Advertising Products or from Adform.


You can find more details on data protection in our privacy policy.
You can also find information about how Google uses personal data by following this link.