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Thread im am somewhat new to this...

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1 im am somewhat new to this...
my name is shawn thomas, and i have been using a few sound programs for a few years now. mainly freeware types, but i have also used adobe audition and acid 4 pro. i am still learning how to use them to their full potentiol. i mainly use them to distort and or clean my mp3's.
however i have a few friends who recently started a band, and they asked if i could do the recording for them. so i started to do some research. i am glad i found this place. i do not have that much money to purchase equiptment. all i really have is my computer, which i built myself to easily handle gaming, graphics, audio and video rendering. it is very powerful and gets upgraded constantly. so thats not the problem. the band rents out practice space downtown, but it is rather small. so we cannot just build an entire studio there. is there anything i can do to just do recordings on my computer, if i take it to their space. if so, what would anyone recommend as for software, and maybe some cheap hardware. i would like to get it to sound as professional as possible. and from watching many behind the scenes music stuff, we all would like to possibly record each instrument and vocals seperately as to get the best sound possible. anyways, i am looking forward to hearing waht you have to say...thanks!
2
Hi shawn,
1) insulation and absorbing material is very important concerning frequencys, especially the low end downwards 300hz.( bass traps).
To get recordings and mixing right, this is the basic rule.
2) about software, if your main concern is live recording I would suggest to use cubase sx or nuendo.They both have powerfull audio engines and wave editing possibilitys.
3) the soundcard should have 4 inputs because , when recording drums properly use 4 mics.( Kick-snare- and two overheads, cymbals and Hihat)
4) a very good recording system is too record the whole band on two tracks or even one track and use it as a pilote.
When you get this right, rythm, feeling etc.... start overdubbing each track separately by recording the drums first then the bass and so on.
Try to record the tracks as powerfull and dynamicly as possible.
When the track recordings are done and you're about too mix it's time to use DSP's, compressing, reverbing and shaping the whole pack.
For software DSP I.E waves from steinberg, this is quite pro.
It's not the ultimate thruth but a good take off to make a pro recording.
One more thing, when you got things right leave mastering to a pro.They can make the difference in selling 10.000 or 100.000 copy's.
I hope this can get you on the right track.
kind regards.
chris pax