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Thread Very strange problem, can't work it out. Shed any light anyone?

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1 Very strange problem, can't work it out. Shed any light anyone?
Very strange problem, can't work it out. Shed any light anyone?

I recently purchased Logic, and running an Apogee duet as my audio interface. Im recording guitar using the amplitube software.

I have some yamaha MSP7 powered studio monitors that i bought used.

Now every time i try to record guitar, whenever i hit the C NOTE on the E and A strings, a weird booming (or louder volume shift) happens. I have returned my apogee and replaced it with a new one to see of that was the problem, but it did the same thing with the new one. I also tried to record with another guitar (this time tuned down a whole tone) and the same thing happens when i play C.

i can't for the life of me work it out!! Could it be faulty monitors?

anyone have any suggestions?
2
Could be the monitors are sensitive to that frequency, do you have mid, high, low switches in the back of your monitor? try adjusting them if so.

does the "booming" happen only in monitoring, or does it happen also on the recorded signal? maybe the guitar is resonating wildly at that spot. check your recording, does the waveform increase in intensity when you play that note?
3
Thanks for your reply kon-tiki

i tried your suggestions, and it doesn't happen in the recording signal. Also, i tried listening through my headphones, and there was no volume shift.

After speaking with some colleagues at work, i tried to put the monitors on the floor (carpet) to see if it still resonates when i play C. That seemed to work, so im assuming my desk (aluminium and glass top) is sensitive to that frequency. Strange, but turns out i have to get the monitors off the desk for them to not resonate at C! Some more money spending on some speaker stands.....

Thanks for your help
4
Yeah, i know what you mean ;). i needed better speaker stands myself at one point. it's a much overlooked aspect of monitoring.