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Peavey T-40
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Greg L. Greg L.
Publié le 07/16/08 à 02:45
T series of Peavey was born in the late 70&#39;s, with which Peavey is one of the first manufacturers of instruments to use numerically controlled machines (CNC) while maintaining the production in the U.S., unlike some manufacturers prefer to relocate production to Mexico, Japan or other Asian countries. The Peavey T40 bass are true "Made In USA".

Originally, this bass came out to hunt on the ground of the Fender Precision ... the pub at the time, deliberately ironic title "Precision Is Not Enough." Lutherie side, we are on familiar ground: ash body, neck and maple fingerboard, 22 frets ... and weight to match. Note nonetheless that the rosewood versions were released, but later and with different finishes (black, sunburst, ...). The original body finish is natural with very little polish: one feels the details of the wood to the touch. The handle is in two parts, but the distinction is that the two parts are assembled in the longitudinal direction, and not as a key reported.

Electronic side, it is less simple than it leaves appear.
The bass has two humbuckers "Super Ferrite", recognizable by their two strips of "rubber" covers the studs, 2 volumes, 2 tones, a three-position switch to choose which microphone to play and a phase inverter for a sound very widened when playing with two microphones simultaneously. The special feature is the tone knobs: on 7, the tone is thoroughly with the windings of the associated micro bottom. If it falls below the tone knob acts as a classic. Below 7, the micro goes progressively single coil. Quite confusing at first, I&#39;m not a fan of this mail, but it is very easy to modify.

The hardware is very solid and in thirty years, the chrome on my bass are not bitten at all. The bridge is very solid and the strings are mounted through the body. The nut appears to be steel (or metal like it).

The downside, at least on mine, for the adjustment. The "neck pocket" (heel, but the body side) is not a perfect fit. Bevels were significant on the body of this bass.

UTILIZATION

One thing clear right away: small jigs and slappeurs crazy, go your way!

This bass is debilitating in several respects: <ul> Point monstrous over 6 kilos on the scales (at home). Without a good strap, it crushes you back ... or think about bodybuilding </ul><ul> Its lack of muzzle at the right forearm and angles very prominent in the table may make it difficult to play </ul><ul> The body is very broad. Take an Ibanez SR in comparison and it will make you feel like a child&#39;s toy on the side. </ul>

The handle is rather like an old Fender Precision handle, can be a bit thinner. It is quite easy to grip, but I have a strong preference for the sleeves of lumberjack, so it can not please everyone.

Given the arrangement of microphones, the slap is very low on this issue ... I would even say it&#39;s a technique to forget about this instrument. The sound is good vacuum, we feel the wood vibrating ... and given the mass of wood there, it would be unfortunate if it does not ring!

SOUNDS

I mainly play rock, punk, hardcore and I allow myself a few pranks in the ska, rocksteady, dub the ... in short, anything that requires a very modern sound, so this bass suits me perfectly in the sound.

The ash body and maple neck while giving a snapping sound and very defined. The low roar under attack with a pick with a "growl" quite enjoyable. Fingers, it does not react badly either, especially on the micro serious, but it&#39;s not really my style of choice.

However, it should be remembered that its design has over thirty years. I could blame the lack of microphones slightly potato and definition, but nothing off-putting. I play mainly an Ampeg B3 to me, but I can not wait to buy an old head lamp (Sound City, Hiwatt and Ampeg same) to assess its potential.
I used it in the studio with the Ampeg SVX plugin and she came out beautifully ... it was even my favorite Music Man Stingray is saying!

I think before all is low for those who have a good offense. In addition to not be suitable for slappeurs, followers of style a little more softly will not find their account. I also mounted with a heavy firing (55-110), but I think I&#39;ll still get a bit higher.

OVERALL OPINION

I&#39;ve had over a year and is poised to dethrone my faithful Stingray in the rock record ... bah yeah, it looks stupid like that, but I think the old T-40 has more presence. I would have tested a Stingray with ash body to see if it comes from the violin, because the body of mine is alder.

I bought my T-40 out of curiosity because it was cheap (300 euros) and I had heard good feedback. One thing is certain: I do not regret this purchase, my only regret is that she was not provided with his original flight case.
These basses are not very common in time, but if you go through eBay by searching in the U.S., are found regularly. Given the present coast (300/400 euros) and its lack of notoriety, it&#39;s really a case dealing with Fender Precision from the same era who rate five times as much.

Besides, if someone sells another key in maple, I sought a second to customize and erase minor complaints I have with him! ;-)
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