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Native Instruments Reaktor 5
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Native Instruments Reaktor 5
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« Native Instruments Reaktor 5 »

Published on 07/18/11 at 15:00
I recently purchased Native Instruments bundle pack called Komplete 7, which comes with all the most popular, and powerful virtual instruments made by this German software company. Native Instruments are known for their almost unmatchable quality of soft-synths like FM8, Absynth and others. Reaktor is one of the companies oldest products and also, interestingly enough, the model for all their other products created. As the name hints, Reaktor let you create your own synth instrument from scratch. A quite amazing feature rarely found in the world of digital music.

Reaktor 5 costs $399 for it’s stand-alone and plug in version. A $99 upgrade is available for those who own the older version, and it can also be purchased as part of Komplete 7 bundle for $499, which includes almost all NI instruments ever made. Quite an awesome deal.

<a href="http://www.musicgearreview.com/category/Software_Educational">http://www.musicgearreview.com/category/Software_Educational</a>

The best feature found on Reaktor is by far its capability for allowing anyone to create their own sound synth or effect from scratch. Although it will require a decent amount of knowledge regarding programming, the possibilities and results are infinite. The pros don’t stop here though. Reaktor comes with amazing sounding built-in synths and effects so you can taste the power of Reaktor right of the bat. It allows the user to even manipulate these built in instruments for your own customization of the instrument. If this isn’t enough, you can also go to NI website and download hundreds of other user-built instruments free of charge.

If you don’t have much knowledge of how synths work or if programming is not your cup of tea, Reaktor might seems at first just like a really complicated plugin. As long as you are willing to sit down and learn all its powerful capabilities, this program can become your favorite weapon in your DAW.

Like all the other NI instruments, quality is definitely quite superb, but it might consume a decent amount of your CPU when running it. As long as you know how this program operates, the amount of enjoyment you will gain in creating your own sound is just unmatchable.

Fans of Native Instruments and synth lovers are certainly to have a blast with this unique product. Anyone could literally feel as though they are channeling Robert Moog by using this application. It’s a highly recommended plug-in for the experienced digital musician. And the German bulletproof quality is there to take you wherever your creativity might lead you.

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This review was originally published on http://www.musicgearreview.com
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