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Thread CUBASE Saving music to audio CD

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Classie83

Classie83

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First post
1 Posted on 09/07/2005 at 12:54:35
I'd like to save a projec to an audio CD. How do I go about doing that? Thanx in advanced.
KitC

KitC

243 posts
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2 Posted on 09/10/2005 at 19:14:54
Alrighty then! Now we're getting somewhere, du... ahem, Classie (I guess I should have noticed that one!):D

If you've got midi tracks in and they're of the general midi type, you can go completely virtual and use the included Universal Sound Module the comes with Cubase. I think it usually installs with Cubase but if it doesn't, just look for the Universal Sound Module folder in the install cd. You can drag copy it into your vstplugins directory on your harddrive. When you restart Cubase, the module should then appear in your VST Instruments popup. This helps you get started with virtual synths.

Once you call up the Universal Sound Module (USM), assign all midi tracks to it and you should be able to have midi sound without turning on a single external module (it also beats the MS GS synth hands down). The important difference between using USM over the MS synth is that your signal path is completely virtual and you can render "in-the-box" without having to wire your soundcard out to an input to capture sound. The Hypersonic demo that comes with Cubase is a fantastic sound source, but is only good for 30 starts.

I'm sorry if I was a bit harsh in my previous post, caffeine hasn't kicked in yet when I posted. Don't be afraid to ask more questions. It's how we all learn. Here's a bit of a tidbit - I usually render bass and drum midi tracks to separate audio tracks so I can add some of Cubase's included effects like compressors and delays separately to them. Once you learn about bussing, add an ambient reverb to that and buss all audio tracks there; makes for a more cohesive mix. Somewhat advanced. I know, but you'll get there.

Glad to have you aboard, Classie83!:)

EDIT: A bit OT. - I noticed that I previously helped you with your QS. How's it coming along? Have you been able to midi it to Cubase yet? Were you able to connect the QS outs to your soundcard?
KitC

KitC

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3 Posted on 09/09/2005 at 19:15:42
If your midi is driving a softsynth, you will have to render them to an audio track before you can export the wave. If the sound source is from an external module, you will have to record that to an audio track as well.
Classie83

Classie83

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4 Posted on 09/10/2005 at 06:11:30

%1$s a écrit If your midi is driving a softsynth, you will have to render them to an audio track before you can export the wave. If the sound source is from an external module, you will have to record that to an audio track as well.


How do I go about rendering them to an audio track? Is there a way to automatically convert them?
Classie83

Classie83

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5 Posted on 09/10/2005 at 11:34:56
Thanx for the info. I have a manual, and I did go through it, but I guess I just didn't see that part of it. I'm new to all this stuff...and I'm not a dude. ;)
KitC

KitC

243 posts
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6 Posted on 09/08/2005 at 02:43:21
You can mixdown the project by exporting it from Cubase to an audio .wav file then dragging the resulting wav file into media player (if you're using windows xp) and burning if from there. The wav file should be in 44.1 khz 16 bit for cd burning.

Most burners come packaged with burning software such as Nero or Easy CD Creator - same process relatively. Nero has its own explorer type window, just open a new audio cd project, drag the wav from the right side of the explorer to the left, and just follow instructions from there.
Classie83

Classie83

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7 Posted on 09/09/2005 at 09:58:25
Hmm....I tried exporting the project to a disc, but it's not happening for some reason. BTW, the tracks are midi tracks.
KitC

KitC

243 posts
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8 Posted on 10/03/2005 at 12:06:10
Hi Classie83!

I didn't mean to slight you with my previous post. There's no mistake in recording to midi, however; as a matter of fact, it's a lot easier to edit a flubbed note in midi than in audio. I do believe, however, that as a classical pianist, flubbed notes are a rarity with you. :) Though Cubase cannot burn to CD, it can render to a wav file provided you record audio into it first. As I previously mentioned, you can use Windows Media Player to burn audio cds. Likewise, if your pc came with a cd burner, it should come with cd burning utilities like Nero, EasyCD or the like.

I've a feeling you're using the onboard sound of your pc. To check you can do the following:

Right click on My Computer, then Properties. Choose the Hardware tab, then press Device Manager. (Alternatively, you can click on Start > Control Panel > System to bring up the System Properties window, too.) Expand the Sound Video and Game Controllers branch by clicking on the plus (+) sign. Your soundcard should be listed among the devices there.

Assuming you're using a standard soundcard or onboard sound, the connectors on the pc will be 1/8" stereo jacks. If your pc is relatively new, the line in jack will be colored light blue (line outs are usually lime green - pls refer to your soundcard's manual). To connect your QS to your pc, you will need a 1/8" stereo TRS to 1/4" TR Y-cable. I don't know how you're monitoring your audio but I'm assuming you connected your monitors directly to your QS. In that case, you might need another Y-cable to connect your monitors to the soundcard's line out. Radioshack usually sells these Y-cables though the most common are 1/8" stereo to RCA male connectors, you will need RCA to 1/4" adapters.

The important thing is to get audio into your pc so you can record and massage it in Cubase. Once we've figured out your soundcard, we can go on to the next step, Recording Audio.
Classie83

Classie83

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9 Posted on 10/03/2005 at 10:32:01
Right I knew that midi wasn't audio. So I guess I've made a mistake in recording it in all midi? And I didn't know that Cubase SE doesn't burn to CD. That's kind of what I wanted to use it for? Is there an alternative way that I can get this music onto CD despite the fact that Cubase doesn't do it?

I'm going to try your suggestions...I don't know how I can check which soundcard(s) I have. I'm not too familiar with the various ones.
KitC

KitC

243 posts
AFfinity Poster
10 Posted on 09/29/2005 at 13:38:43
Hello again!

Midi isn't audio. It's only a series of control messages that commands your synth on what notes to turn on and off, when to do so and for how long (actually, it's more than that but let's not get into details). In short, midi has no 'sound' of it's own.

There are 2 ways to record your performance:

1) connect the audio outs of your QS to a recorder of some sort (casette, hard disk recorder, MD recorder, Pro Tools, etc.) or...

2) connect the audio outs of the QS to the LINE INPUTS of your soundcard. In Cubase, you can right click on an empty portion beneath the midi tracks and create an audio track. I forgot to mention that you must also configure cubase for your audio inputs and outputs. You can't burn to cd using Cubase, but you can use media player in a pinch.

I don't think you mentioned what soundcard you were using. Give us an idea and we can walk you through on what to do.
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