Become a member
Become a member
Continuer avec Google

or
Log in
Log in
Se connecter avec Google

or
Add this product to
  • Mon ancien matos
  • My current gear
  • Mon futur matos
Gibson Les Paul BFG
Images
1/210
Gibson Les Paul BFG

LP-Shaped Guitar from Gibson belonging to the Les Paul series.

< Return to the list of user reviews
MatrixClaw MatrixClaw

« Beats Paying Twice as Much for a Standard! »

Publié le 04/02/11 à 18:52
The BFG Features:

- Unsanded carved flame maple top
- Mahogany back
- 1950s rounded mahogany neck
- Rosewood fingerboard
- 24-3/4" scale
- 22 frets
- 1.695" nut width
- White side dot inlays
- Black chrome hardware
- Distressed stopbar
- Tune-O-Matic bridge
- Wooden volume and tone knobs
- Distressed Grover tuners
- Zebra BurstBucker 3 bridge, P-90 neck
- Kill switch toggle
- See-through wiring covers

Made in the USA

UTILIZATION

This is easily my favorite playing Les Paul of all time. The familiar feel of a standard, but with a satin finish on the neck, instead of a glossy lacquer, which allows for a much smoother neck and quicker speed along the fretboard. My only wish is that these came with 24 frets, instead of 22, because the cutaway on Les Pauls make it somewhat hard to get up to the top frets - Those extra 2 frets would mean I might actually be able to get to the 22nd fret!

The killswitch, while not all too practical for most people, is a cool feature that allows you to kill the sound of the guitar instantly. Useful for in between songs at gigs, or at home, if your amp is prone to feedback, or if you don't want to accidently hit a string and make noise (so you don't have to roll your volume back).

The neck is the 50's neck, which is fatter than the 60's slim neck, but not quite as fat as the R9's neck. However, don't let that fool you, while it's what some might consider a "baseball bat" or "boat" neck, it's really quite comfortable and the satin neck adds MUCH more speed to it than would normally be available in other Les Pauls.

SOUNDS

This guitar is amazingly versatile, and is my first experience with a P90. Unfortunately, I bought mine used, and it didn't come stock, instead, it has an EMG 81 in the bridge, and a P85 in the neck. Normally, I'm not a huge fan of EMGs, but they sound great in a big chunk of mahogany!

The tone of this guitar is only what I can explain as... Chunky. It's got a huge, thick tone to it that will make any amp sound full and crisp. The P-90 neck pickup is awesome, and is the closest I've come to achieving the tone I've been wanting out of my neck pickup for years. They are more aggressive than a normal humbucker in the position, and really cut through a mix nicely. They still retain the neck position's fatness, without sounding muddy and overly bassy, very nice!

OVERALL OPINION

Overall, I really like this guitar. It's an excellent platform for upgrades, of which I've pretty much upgraded everything on, but I'm sure it sounds and plays great in stock configuration.

For the price these guitars pop up for on the used market, it's hard to pass them up. They utterly demolish the Studios, and are easily as good as a Standard if you don't need all the bells and whistles. I'd definitely recommend this to anyone looking to pick up a Gibson that's actually worth the price it costs!
cookies

We are using cookies!

Yes, Audiofanzine is using cookies. Since the last thing that we want is disturbing your diet with too much fat or too much sugar, you'll be glad to learn that we made them ourselves with fresh, organic and fair ingredients, and with a perfect nutritional balance. What this means is that the data we store in them is used to enhance your use of our website as well as improve your user experience on our pages (learn more). To configure your cookie preferences, click here.

We did not wait for a law to make us respect our members and visitors' privacy. The cookies that we use are only meant to improve your experience on our website.

Our cookies

Cookies not subject to consent

These are cookies that guarantee the proper functioning of Audiofanzine and allow its optimization. The website cannot function properly without these cookies.

Website preferences

We store your preferences so that you do not have to re-enter them every time your come back (forums options, dark or light theme, classifieds filter, standard or buzz news, newsletters popups...).

Log in

This one makes sure you don't have to re-enter your credentials every time you visit Audiofanzine.

Analytics

This data allows us to understand the use that our visitors make of our website in an attempt to improve it.

Advertising

This information allows us to show you personalized advertisements thanks to which Audiofanzine is financed. By unchecking this box you will still have advertisements but they may be less interesting :)

We did not wait for a law to make us respect our members and visitors' privacy. The cookies that we use are only meant to improve your experience on our website.

Our cookies

Cookies not subject to consent

These are cookies that guarantee the proper functioning of Audiofanzine and allow its optimization. The website cannot function properly without these cookies.

Website preferences

We store your preferences so that you do not have to re-enter them every time your come back (forums options, dark or light theme, classifieds filter, standard or buzz news, newsletters popups...).

Log in

This one makes sure you don't have to re-enter your credentials every time you visit Audiofanzine.

Analytics

This data allows us to understand the use that our visitors make of our website in an attempt to improve it.

Advertising

This information allows us to show you personalized advertisements thanks to which Audiofanzine is financed. By unchecking this box you will still have advertisements but they may be less interesting :)


You can find more details on data protection in our privacy policy.