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Advice for a mixdown checklist

 
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michaelsounds

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michaelsounds
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1 Posted on 10/01/2014 at 07:36:10Direct link to this post
Howdy,

I want to make an infographic or basic list of things to do once you believe your track is done. Something to stick somewhere to help double-check things like:

have you monitored in mono? is your mix too narrow or wide? are all elements EQd and in their own space? etc

any idea of what things you would add?

EQlikeaboss

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EQlikeaboss
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2 Posted on 10/01/2014 at 08:59:26Direct link to this post
Listen verrrrry quietly (~ 50dB) to see that the most important parts of your mix are still present. This is crucial for double checking the balance of your mixdown

essexnexus

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essexnexus
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3 Posted on 10/02/2014 at 05:19:36Direct link to this post
Always reference your mixes. Often you'll get caught up in your head and ideas and after hours of mixing you might not catch mistakes. Choosing the right reference is KEY, obviously, so it's important to use a referencing track with an artist similar to yours, a sound guitar/keys/etc that matches, in order to help you pick out things in your mix that may need adjustments

BroKen91

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BroKen91
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4 Posted on 10/02/2014 at 05:28:52Direct link to this post

d.bakes

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d.bakes
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5 Posted on 10/02/2014 at 07:36:23Direct link to this post
Check out beyerdynamic's virtual studio: https://en.audiofanzine.com/surround-sound-spacialization-software/beyerdynamic/virtual-studio/news/a.play,n.15795.html

It provides several different acoustic environment simulators from stadium to car to help you test the success of your mixdown.

Edit: most importantly, it's free :mdr:

[ Post last edited on 10/02/2014 at 07:36:46 ]

Mike Levine

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Mike Levine
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6 Posted on 10/02/2014 at 15:09:19Direct link to this post
Quote:
I want to make an infographic or basic list of things to do once you believe your track is done. Something to stick somewhere to help double-check things like:

have you monitored in mono? is your mix too narrow or wide? are all elements EQd and in their own space? etc

any idea of what things you would add?


I would add, "Did you give yourself enough time away from the mix to be able to judge it objectively?" It's very hard at the end of a long mix session to really know what you've got. Give yourself a little space from it. Preferably overnight, or at least a few hours. When you come back to it, you'll hear it with more objectivity, and will likely notice a lot of stuff you missed at the end of the session.

trickymix

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trickymix
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7 Posted on 10/03/2014 at 02:08:16Direct link to this post
Quote from Mike Levine:
I would add, "Did you give yourself enough time away from the mix to be able to judge it objectively?" It's very hard at the end of a long mix session to really know what you've got. Give yourself a little space from it.


Absolutely. Also related to something I would suggest, which is not to take too long on a mix. By that I mean, there's a certain point we reach where the mix doesn't get better, just different. You want to avoid being stuck in an endless mixing labyrinth or no return. I think Mike's suggestion helps with this as well

mr motown

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mr motown
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8 Posted on 10/03/2014 at 02:40:02Direct link to this post
I make a habit of saving backups of different finished mixes before changing them around so I can always go back just in case the original was better than the endless tinkering done afterwards. one of the first things i would recommend to others out there

Mike Levine

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Mike Levine
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9 Posted on 10/03/2014 at 05:05:42Direct link to this post
Quote:
Absolutely. Also related to something I would suggest, which is not to take too long on a mix. By that I mean, there's a certain point we reach where the mix doesn't get better, just different. You want to avoid being stuck in an endless mixing labyrinth or no return.

Yes, very true. It's always difficult to know when you've reached that point where you're no longer improving the mix, but actually harming it.

Quote:
I make a habit of saving backups of different finished mixes before changing them around so I can always go back just in case the original was better than the endless tinkering done afterwards. one of the first things i would recommend to others out there

Agreed. That's very important. When I make a significant change in a mix, I "save as," and name the file with a description of the change, like "Lead vocal up 2dB." I leave myself a breadcrumb trail so that I can retrace my steps if necessary.

angelie

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angelie
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10 Posted on 10/12/2014 at 00:57:02Direct link to this post
A bit late but i just signup for this:


-Don't take your mix fot granted.

-Leave it alone for a week so you can listen again. Sit back after some nights of good sleep.

-Listen on different locations and setups: portable radio, car, livingroom of a friend etc.

- Let a friend or colleague press the bypass buttons of eq and compressors but don't let him/her tell when. Close your eyes and listen to determine which is best. ( you guess if it is the bypassed version or not)

-Louder sounds always better... Use the gain to level things out so you can listen to the changes at the same levels.

- Let others listen too ( listening session's) let them write down what they think. Read and review that with them. Remember to keep open minded. Nobody likes there mixes to be trashed by others. But somethimes they got a point you missed.

It's not about what you got to use but how you use what you got.

[ Post last edited on 10/12/2014 at 01:08:19 ]

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