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Thread Standards to follow when mixing

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1 Standards to follow when mixing
I know most people have their own unique mixing process, but at school I will provide a presentation on mixing and wanted to demonstrate a live mix. While it won't be too in-depth or perfect do to time constraints, I'm mainly trying to show the other students what is the most STANDARD, basic, common way possible to approach mixing. That is to say, what should be the first, 2nd, 3rd, 4th step in mixing that practically everyone does before they use their own, unique approach.

I hope that makes sense. Thanks!
2
the 3 main things I would consider 'standard mixing ops' would be:

  • Be sure that none of your audio tracks are clipping
  • adjust volume and panning automation to make sure everything sits nicely together regarding volume
  • use EQ and compression on the individual tracks that need it better (cut harsh frequencies, adjust anything that stands out)
3
Where would you include things like FX processing, automation, gating the drums and other stuff that happen in pretty much every mix?
4
Quote from fenderbender88:
Where would you include things like FX processing, automation, gating the drums and other stuff that happen in pretty much every mix?


Well that depends on how long your presentation will be? I mean if you only have 10 minutes, it's hard to do much more than levels and panning (i.e. the most basic form of mixing), unless you plan on having a shitty final mix after 10 minutes of randomly assigning plug-ins and adjusting EQ and progression
5
Thanks for the responses guys.

What I'm planning for my presentation is to prepare different stages of mixing in advance so with the EQ, as an example, I would demonstrate quickly on one track then load the project file that I've already EQed in advance to show the better quality that comes with fine-tuning an EQ, if that makes sense.

Regardless, I'm not gonna blow anyones top off with the best mix of all time. Above all else I'm just trying to demonstrate the theory in a way that even non-sound engineers would understand
6
Quote:
I would demonstrate quickly on one track then load the project file that I've already EQed in advance to show the better quality that comes with fine-tuning an EQ, if that makes sense.

That sounds like a good approach. A/B comparisons are very powerful for making a point. Best of luck with it.
7
Here are the basic initial steps IMO:

  • organize your dry stems
  • set up your return channels for room, delay, etc
  • process individual tracks as needed (compression, EQ, gating, etc)
  • set up groups where necessary (i.e. drum tracks if you're processing drums together)then process
  • do all automation, panning, crossfades, etc
  • MIX (here you focus on things like leveling and room image
  • correct the mix with fresh ears then prepare for mastering