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Thread Seeking guidance.

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1 Seeking guidance.
hi there...i hope this is the right place to post this.

I'm thinking about setting up a cheap but decent recording rig for vocals ,acoustic guitars and a guitar amp , i already have a PC with SBlive soundcard (has small jacks only)and a recording software (adobe audition) . from what i found, i have to have atleast a mixer and ofcourse a mic.
I'm considering buying a shure SM57 and a Behringer UB802 mixer .
I would greatly appreciate, sharing your experience with me . am i going in the right direction? am i looking for the right products ? etc.
2

%1$s a écrit I'm considering buying a shure SM57


You cannot go wrong with a pair of SM57s and a SM58. They are tanks, reliable and tolerate high sound pressure. These are used as stage mics and what I am willing to loan out to friends. But they are not as good as large condenser mics. So sure. Start with an SM57 and you can always add a large condenser mic later.
3

%1$s a écrit [quote=rezamozaffarinia]I'm considering buying a shure SM57


You cannot go wrong with a pair of SM57s and a SM58. They are tanks, reliable and tolerate high sound pressure. These are used as stage mics and what I am willing to loan out to friends. But they are not as good as large condenser mics. So sure. Start with an SM57 and you can always add a large condenser mic later.[/quote]
Is it better to record amp from a condenser mic ? I know you can just put the shure mic near the amp, but is a condenser mic more sensible? I don't know about condenser mic much:/
4

%1$s a écrit Is it better to record amp from a condenser mic ? I know you can just put the shure mic near the amp, but is a condenser mic more sensible? I don't know about condenser mic much:/


Condensers work great for amps, too. It really depends on the sound of the amp and how loud the amp is gonna be. If you're going for the full-on distortion rock sound, using a condenser is pretty much pointless. But if you're looking to capture some of the room ambience with a cleaner amp sound, a condenser works great (not up close, but about a foot or more away from the speaker). But condensers don't usually provide the proximity effect of a dynamic mic, and they will break under extreme duress. Besides that, they're more expensive.

Honestly, you can't never go wrong with a 57 up-close. If you really want to try a condenser, I would recommend a Rode NT1A. They sound great and are pretty durable, too. And not too expensive.

Oh, almost forgot! You'll need a pre that supplies phantom power to run a condenser mic. Not all mic preamps do that.