Become a member
Become a member

or
Continue with Google
Log in
Log in

or
Log in using a Google account

Thread Acoustic Guitar/Vocal recording questions

  • 6 replies
  • 5 participants
  • 1,504 views
  • 0 follower
hereitgoes

hereitgoes

4 posts
New AFfiliate
First post
1 Posted on 02/11/2004 at 08:10:50
Hi,
I've had Pro Tools LE, the Mbox, and my Powerbook G4 for a few months now and have a few questions about basic recording with vocals and acoustic guitar. As of now I've been plugging in my acoustic guitar directly into the Mbox, and I've been using a Shure Sm58 for the vocals. Any ideas as to how I could improve the sound quality of the guitar? (with mixing, levels etc.)
I have been thinking about buying a condenser mic for the guitar, and possibly to use for vocals as well, but I'm on a really tight budget. Can anyone recommend some quality condensers at a decent price?
Lastly, I find that no matter what I do in the final mix, the overall volume of each song tends to be much softer than a track on a real CD. I have been raising the levels of each track so that the master fader level is as high as it can go, but perhaps their is something else I can do?

Thanks so much, I really appreciate the help.
Bowisc

Bowisc

30 posts
New AFfiliate
2 Posted on 02/11/2004 at 12:10:24

Quote: Hi,
I've had Pro Tools LE, the Mbox, and my Powerbook G4 for a few months now and have a few questions about basic recording with vocals and acoustic guitar. As of now I've been plugging in my acoustic guitar directly into the Mbox, and I've been using a Shure Sm58 for the vocals. Any ideas as to how I could improve the sound quality of the guitar? (with mixing, levels etc.)
I have been thinking about buying a condenser mic for the guitar, and possibly to use for vocals as well, but I'm on a really tight budget. Can anyone recommend some quality condensers at a decent price?
Lastly, I find that no matter what I do in the final mix, the overall volume of each song tends to be much softer than a track on a real CD. I have been raising the levels of each track so that the master fader level is as high as it can go, but perhaps their is something else I can do?

Thanks so much, I really appreciate the help.



I recommend every studio have a Studio Projects B1 mic. It's very versatile and only costs about $80 U.S. I've used my pair for a lot of sources, including acoustic guitar. Between this mic and your existing SM-58, you'd cover a lot of ground.

Try a combination or all of these:
-Try to record a hot a signal as possible before clipping.
-Try normalizing your track
-Try using compression or limiting to get a hotter signal that is more consistant in level.

(I think I used the word "try" more than I should).
I tried.

:)
redplanetdrifter

redplanetdrifter

26 posts
New AFfiliate
3 Posted on 02/11/2004 at 15:19:05
I agree with what bowisc said, and I would also add that I have had really good results using an sm58 on accoustic. I also have a really cheap Nady sp9 that is one of the most accurate accoustic mics I have used. Check with musicians friend, they run some good deals on mics most of the time. As for a good condenser, Bheringer and Shure would probably be your best bet.
gretscguy

gretscguy

1 post
New AFfiliate
4 Posted on 02/11/2004 at 15:43:18
A great acoustic guitar mic is the Marshall (MXL) 990. I bought a pair for about $120.00 from Musician's Friend and they sound spectacular on my two acoustics ('59 Martin OO-21 and '64 Gibson J-45).

Not the best on vocals, but very nice on acoustic guitars. There was a writeup on this mic in a sidebar of a recent issue of recording which made me check them out.
hereitgoes

hereitgoes

4 posts
New AFfiliate
5 Posted on 02/12/2004 at 07:04:47
Thanks guys,
I have been reading up on the Studio Projects mics. They've really been reviewed well.
Would you recommend purchasing two of them to mic an acoustic guitar? Also, it seems as if the C1 mic is slightly superior to the B1, but is it worth the price? If I also wanted to use the mic(s) for vocals, would you suggest the C1 or the B1's, or maybe one of each would do the trick for both guitar and vocals?
Thanks again for all the help! I really appreciate the advice.
Bowisc

Bowisc

30 posts
New AFfiliate
6 Posted on 02/12/2004 at 08:05:04

Quote: Thanks guys,
I have been reading up on the Studio Projects mics. They've really been reviewed well.
Would you recommend purchasing two of them to mic an acoustic guitar? Also, it seems as if the C1 mic is slightly superior to the B1, but is it worth the price? If I also wanted to use the mic(s) for vocals, would you suggest the C1 or the B1's, or maybe one of each would do the trick for both guitar and vocals?
Thanks again for all the help! I really appreciate the advice.



The C1 caters more to vocals. I have a C3 and think it has a nicer sound, plus more flexibility with multi-patterns. Yes, the C1 is well worth what it goes for, but know that it is on the "bright" side of the spectrum and that it may not be as flexible on different sources.

FWIW, the B1 is a super rugged mic. I've taken mine apart and they are built extremely well. The low price is because SP deals in volume... the B1 is way under-rated. The B3 (multi-pattern) has more coloration in sound and goes for about $160.

Another option is Oktava MK012. These are small-diaphragm condensor mics with changeable capsules. Guitar Center throws good deals on these, sometimes two for $100. But even at $100-200 each, they are excellent for the money. In my personal opinion, the next step would be something like Neuman KM-184's or Josephson C42 (just got a pair). But under $500, the Oktavas are very hard to beat.

Marshall MXL603s are another small diaphragm option. They cost about $80 each or you can get a package deal with 2 of them, shockmounts, and case for about $200. I have a pair but usually prefer the Oktavas most of the time.

There are many options.
My advice is find a place with favorable return policy, buy a few, try them out in your space, and then decide which would be the best tool for you. Return the ones you don't want to keep.

IMO,
Studio Projects B1 ($80), Oktava MK012 ($100) would basically take care of your needs for a while... until you're ready to move up into the majors (Neumann, Josephson, Earthworks, etc.).
Dloving

Dloving

1 post
New AFfiliate
7 Posted on 02/15/2004 at 23:28:04
You have to buy a condensor mic. Spend the money. I bought a shure KSM 44 and it is worth its weight in gold!! It is a world of difference. :D
cookies
We are using cookies!

Yes, Audiofanzine is using cookies. Since the last thing that we want is disturbing your diet with too much fat or too much sugar, you'll be glad to learn that we made them ourselves with fresh, organic and fair ingredients, and with a perfect nutritional balance. What this means is that the data we store in them is used to enhance your use of our website as well as improve your user experience on our pages (learn more). To configure your cookie preferences, click here.

We did not wait for a law to make us respect our members and visitors' privacy. The cookies that we use are only meant to improve your experience on our website.

Our cookies
Cookies not subject to consent
These are cookies that guarantee the proper functioning of Audiofanzine and allow its optimization. The website cannot function properly without these cookies. Example: cookies that help you stay logged in from page to page or that help customizing your usage of the website (dark mode or filters).
Google Analytics
We are using Google Analytics in order to better understand the use that our visitors make of our website in an attempt to improve it.
Advertising
This information allows us to show you personalized advertisements thanks to which Audiofanzine is financed. By unchecking this box you will still have advertisements but they may be less interesting :) We are using Google Ad Manager to display part of our ads, or tools integrated to our own CMS for the rest.

We did not wait for a law to make us respect our members and visitors' privacy. The cookies that we use are only meant to improve your experience on our website.

Our cookies
Cookies not subject to consent

These are cookies that guarantee the proper functioning of Audiofanzine. The website cannot function properly without these cookies. Examples: cookies that help you stay logged in from page to page or that help customizing your usage of the website (dark mode or filters).

Google Analytics

We are using Google Analytics in order to better understand the use that our visitors make of our website in an attempt to improve it. When this parameter is activated, no personal information is sent to Google and the IP addresses are anonymized.

Advertising

This information allows us to show you personalized advertisements thanks to which Audiofanzine is financed. By unchecking this box you will still have advertisements but they may be less interesting :) We are using Google Ad Manager to display part of our ads, or tools integrated to our own CMS for the rest.


You can find more details on data protection in our privacy policy.
You can also find information about how Google uses personal data by following this link.