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Thread Pro 24 crackling / dropout issues upon install in Windows 10

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1 Pro 24 crackling / dropout issues upon install in Windows 10
Hi --

Installing my Pro 24 for the first time; coincidentally a few days after upgrading to Windows 10, so it's tough to find specific support relating to the relatively new Win 10 platform.

With a TI chipset Firewire, setup went fine and it passed audio right away. (Haven't even set up a DAW or modules yet; simply trying to test the Pro 24 by playing computer sounds and mp3's through it.)

However, LOTS of crackling and dropouts -- pretty terrible audio quality. At first constant; later intermittent. Tried adjusting Firewire driver latency and ASIO buffer size; all to no avail. Finally disabled my wireless network card, which I THINK (so far, anyway) seemed to fix the problem. But I'd like to find a way to keep my network access active, and to use the Pro 24 audio at all times with this computer, including streaming.

So does anyone know any other solutions to interference from the network card short of disabling it? Maybe adjusting settings on the network card, or anything else? Knowing zero about network cards, I don't want to experiment and mess up perfectly-functioning settings, but I see settings for receive buffers, transmit buffers, and scan valid interval...

Thanks in advance for any ideas. -- Randy
2
Hi Randy,

Dropouts & bad quality audio are often caused by DPC latency, an interrupt request by another driver/hardware combo that is preventing your PC from streaming audio in real time. To check if this is indeed the issue, Could you download the DPC latency checker from this website, then send me a screen shot of the graph once opened for a minute or so while playing audio out at the same time? :

http://www.resplendence.com/latencymon (Win 8 & Win 10)

If this is mainly happening when recording, as opposed to playback, then please run the software while running your DAW at the same time.
The best test I would suggest here is to reactivate your Network card and run the above test, take a screenshot of the results, once done, disable the network card and re-run the test, please then post these results. If the results do point to the Network card as the culprit, then the solution is often simply to ensure you have the latest updated drivers for that card on the OS you have installed.

Please do let me know how you get on.

Simon // Focusrite Technical Support
3
Hi, Simon --

Thanks very much for your help with this.

Even though the audible distortion seems to cease when I disable the network card, the analysis apparently shows I still have latency problems either way.

Network card enabled:
http://s77.photobucket.com/user/radiocynic/media/LatencyNetworkCardEnabled_zpsh8ejh3np.jpg.html

Network card disabled:
http://s77.photobucket.com/user/radiocynic/media/LatencyNetworkCardDisabled_zpsbslu5pm1.jpg.html

I'll probably now set about trying to find a BIOS update or look into other things the analysis mentioned, but I'd really appreciate any input you have on possible solutions.

Haven't even tried any recording with this, or even set up a DAW yet. This is all simply trying to first get it to play back existing audio (like an mp3 or even a Windows notification sound) without distortion.

Thanks again for the help! -- Randy
4
For some reason the jpeg screenshots I'm trying to include don't seem to be displaying. Here's the text readout from the latencymon:

Network card enabled:
_________________________________________________________________________________________________________
CONCLUSION
_________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Your system appears to be having trouble handling real-time audio and other tasks. You are likely to experience buffer underruns appearing as drop outs, clicks or pops. One or more DPC routines that belong to a driver running in your system appear to be executing for too long. At least one detected problem appears to be network related. In case you are using a WLAN adapter, try disabling it to get better results. One problem may be related to power management, disable CPU throttling settings in Control Panel and BIOS setup. Check for BIOS updates.
LatencyMon has been analyzing your system for 0:01:04 (h:mm:ss) on all processors.


_________________________________________________________________________________________________________
SYSTEM INFORMATION
_________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Computer name: VAIOVPCF13UFX
OS version: Windows 8 , 6.2, build: 9200 (x64)
Hardware: VPCF13UFX, Sony Corporation, VAIO
CPU: GenuineIntel Intel(R) Core(TM) i7 CPU Q 740 @ 1.73GHz
Logical processors: 8
Processor groups: 1
RAM: 8172 MB total


_________________________________________________________________________________________________________
CPU SPEED
_________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Reported CPU speed: 1729 MHz

Note: reported execution times may be calculated based on a fixed reported CPU speed. Disable variable speed settings like Intel Speed Step and AMD Cool N Quiet in the BIOS setup for more accurate results.


_________________________________________________________________________________________________________
MEASURED INTERRUPT TO USER PROCESS LATENCIES
_________________________________________________________________________________________________________
The interrupt to process latency reflects the measured interval that a usermode process needed to respond to a hardware request from the moment the interrupt service routine started execution. This includes the scheduling and execution of a DPC routine, the signaling of an event and the waking up of a usermode thread from an idle wait state in response to that event.

Highest measured interrupt to process latency (µs): 4717.587315
Average measured interrupt to process latency (µs): 69.400404

Highest measured interrupt to DPC latency (µs): 4651.851413
Average measured interrupt to DPC latency (µs): 52.930768


_________________________________________________________________________________________________________
REPORTED ISRs
_________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Interrupt service routines are routines installed by the OS and device drivers that execute in response to a hardware interrupt signal.

Highest ISR routine execution time (µs): 840.026027
Driver with highest ISR routine execution time: rimssne64.sys - RICOH MS Driver, REDC

Highest reported total ISR routine time (%): 4.128255
Driver with highest ISR total time: rimssne64.sys - RICOH MS Driver, REDC

Total time spent in ISRs (%) 5.094019

ISR count (execution time <250 µs): 1480378
ISR count (execution time 250-500 µs): 0
ISR count (execution time 500-999 µs): 1084
ISR count (execution time 1000-1999 µs): 0
ISR count (execution time 2000-3999 µs): 0
ISR count (execution time >=4000 µs): 0


_________________________________________________________________________________________________________
REPORTED DPCs
_________________________________________________________________________________________________________
DPC routines are part of the interrupt servicing dispatch mechanism and disable the possibility for a process to utilize the CPU while it is interrupted until the DPC has finished execution.

Highest DPC routine execution time (µs): 4288.006940
Driver with highest DPC routine execution time: ndis.sys - Network Driver Interface Specification (NDIS), Microsoft Corporation

Highest reported total DPC routine time (%): 2.821934
Driver with highest DPC total execution time: Wdf01000.sys - Kernel Mode Driver Framework Runtime, Microsoft Corporation

Total time spent in DPCs (%) 3.647213

DPC count (execution time <250 µs): 620319
DPC count (execution time 250-500 µs): 0
DPC count (execution time 500-999 µs): 24273
DPC count (execution time 1000-1999 µs): 671
DPC count (execution time 2000-3999 µs): 274
DPC count (execution time >=4000 µs): 0


_________________________________________________________________________________________________________
REPORTED HARD PAGEFAULTS
_________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Hard pagefaults are events that get triggered by making use of virtual memory that is not resident in RAM but backed by a memory mapped file on disk. The process of resolving the hard pagefault requires reading in the memory from disk while the process is interrupted and blocked from execution.

NOTE: some processes were hit by hard pagefaults. If these were programs producing audio, they are likely to interrupt the audio stream resulting in dropouts, clicks and pops. Check the Processes tab to see which programs were hit.

Process with highest pagefault count: chrome.exe

Total number of hard pagefaults 60
Hard pagefault count of hardest hit process: 49
Highest hard pagefault resolution time (µs): 30770.146327
Total time spent in hard pagefaults (%): 0.040601
Number of processes hit: 6


_________________________________________________________________________________________________________
PER CPU DATA
_________________________________________________________________________________________________________
CPU 0 Interrupt cycle time (s): 39.994833
CPU 0 ISR highest execution time (µs): 840.026027
CPU 0 ISR total execution time (s): 24.718388
CPU 0 ISR count: 1441889
CPU 0 DPC highest execution time (µs): 4199.693464
CPU 0 DPC total execution time (s): 15.293790
CPU 0 DPC count: 599854
_________________________________________________________________________________________________________
CPU 1 Interrupt cycle time (s): 6.292210
CPU 1 ISR highest execution time (µs): 695.622903
CPU 1 ISR total execution time (s): 1.322950
CPU 1 ISR count: 33170
CPU 1 DPC highest execution time (µs): 4288.006940
CPU 1 DPC total execution time (s): 2.516321
CPU 1 DPC count: 24189
_________________________________________________________________________________________________________
CPU 2 Interrupt cycle time (s): 2.121879
CPU 2 ISR highest execution time (µs): 315.248120
CPU 2 ISR total execution time (s): 0.072096
CPU 2 ISR count: 4436
CPU 2 DPC highest execution time (µs): 4242.067091
CPU 2 DPC total execution time (s): 0.372941
CPU 2 DPC count: 7338
_________________________________________________________________________________________________________
CPU 3 Interrupt cycle time (s): 2.286032
CPU 3 ISR highest execution time (µs): 101.688259
CPU 3 ISR total execution time (s): 0.008777
CPU 3 ISR count: 618
CPU 3 DPC highest execution time (µs): 3926.061307
CPU 3 DPC total execution time (s): 0.064775
CPU 3 DPC count: 2457
_________________________________________________________________________________________________________
CPU 4 Interrupt cycle time (s): 1.837840
CPU 4 ISR highest execution time (µs): 0.0
CPU 4 ISR total execution time (s): 0.0
CPU 4 ISR count: 0
CPU 4 DPC highest execution time (µs): 3963.973973
CPU 4 DPC total execution time (s): 0.193845
CPU 4 DPC count: 3018
_________________________________________________________________________________________________________
CPU 5 Interrupt cycle time (s): 2.002425
CPU 5 ISR highest execution time (µs): 0.0
CPU 5 ISR total execution time (s): 0.0
CPU 5 ISR count: 0
CPU 5 DPC highest execution time (µs): 4011.371313
CPU 5 DPC total execution time (s): 0.077120
CPU 5 DPC count: 1754
_________________________________________________________________________________________________________
CPU 6 Interrupt cycle time (s): 2.221451
CPU 6 ISR highest execution time (µs): 46.143436
CPU 6 ISR total execution time (s): 0.003588
CPU 6 ISR count: 1349
CPU 6 DPC highest execution time (µs): 3888.368999
CPU 6 DPC total execution time (s): 0.141462
CPU 6 DPC count: 4047
_________________________________________________________________________________________________________
CPU 7 Interrupt cycle time (s): 2.891757
CPU 7 ISR highest execution time (µs): 0.0
CPU 7 ISR total execution time (s): 0.0
CPU 7 ISR count: 0
CPU 7 DPC highest execution time (µs): 3893.615963
CPU 7 DPC total execution time (s): 0.045282
CPU 7 DPC count: 2929
_________________________________________________________________________________________________________


Network card disabled:
_________________________________________________________________________________________________________
CONCLUSION
_________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Your system appears to be having trouble handling real-time audio and other tasks. You are likely to experience buffer underruns appearing as drop outs, clicks or pops. One or more DPC routines that belong to a driver running in your system appear to be executing for too long. Also one or more ISR routines that belong to a driver running in your system appear to be executing for too long. One problem may be related to power management, disable CPU throttling settings in Control Panel and BIOS setup. Check for BIOS updates.
LatencyMon has been analyzing your system for 0:01:09 (h:mm:ss) on all processors.


_________________________________________________________________________________________________________
SYSTEM INFORMATION
_________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Computer name: VAIOVPCF13UFX
OS version: Windows 8 , 6.2, build: 9200 (x64)
Hardware: VPCF13UFX, Sony Corporation, VAIO
CPU: GenuineIntel Intel(R) Core(TM) i7 CPU Q 740 @ 1.73GHz
Logical processors: 8
Processor groups: 1
RAM: 8172 MB total


_________________________________________________________________________________________________________
CPU SPEED
_________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Reported CPU speed: 1729 MHz

Note: reported execution times may be calculated based on a fixed reported CPU speed. Disable variable speed settings like Intel Speed Step and AMD Cool N Quiet in the BIOS setup for more accurate results.


_________________________________________________________________________________________________________
MEASURED INTERRUPT TO USER PROCESS LATENCIES
_________________________________________________________________________________________________________
The interrupt to process latency reflects the measured interval that a usermode process needed to respond to a hardware request from the moment the interrupt service routine started execution. This includes the scheduling and execution of a DPC routine, the signaling of an event and the waking up of a usermode thread from an idle wait state in response to that event.

Highest measured interrupt to process latency (µs): 19402.158625
Average measured interrupt to process latency (µs): 45.926162

Highest measured interrupt to DPC latency (µs): 19395.644256
Average measured interrupt to DPC latency (µs): 33.892468


_________________________________________________________________________________________________________
REPORTED ISRs
_________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Interrupt service routines are routines installed by the OS and device drivers that execute in response to a hardware interrupt signal.

Highest ISR routine execution time (µs): 733106.617120
Driver with highest ISR routine execution time: dxgkrnl.sys - DirectX Graphics Kernel, Microsoft Corporation

Highest reported total ISR routine time (%): 0.748011
Driver with highest ISR total time: rimssne64.sys - RICOH MS Driver, REDC

Total time spent in ISRs (%) 1.174264

ISR count (execution time <250 µs): 311681
ISR count (execution time 250-500 µs): 0
ISR count (execution time 500-999 µs): 107
ISR count (execution time 1000-1999 µs): 0
ISR count (execution time 2000-3999 µs): 0
ISR count (execution time >=4000 µs): 0


_________________________________________________________________________________________________________
REPORTED DPCs
_________________________________________________________________________________________________________
DPC routines are part of the interrupt servicing dispatch mechanism and disable the possibility for a process to utilize the CPU while it is interrupted until the DPC has finished execution.

Highest DPC routine execution time (µs): 596868.882013
Driver with highest DPC routine execution time: ntoskrnl.exe - NT Kernel & System, Microsoft Corporation

Highest reported total DPC routine time (%): 0.602326
Driver with highest DPC total execution time: rimssne64.sys - RICOH MS Driver, REDC

Total time spent in DPCs (%) 0.712582

DPC count (execution time <250 µs): 122066
DPC count (execution time 250-500 µs): 0
DPC count (execution time 500-999 µs): 3202
DPC count (execution time 1000-1999 µs): 0
DPC count (execution time 2000-3999 µs): 0
DPC count (execution time >=4000 µs): 0


_________________________________________________________________________________________________________
REPORTED HARD PAGEFAULTS
_________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Hard pagefaults are events that get triggered by making use of virtual memory that is not resident in RAM but backed by a memory mapped file on disk. The process of resolving the hard pagefault requires reading in the memory from disk while the process is interrupted and blocked from execution.

NOTE: some processes were hit by hard pagefaults. If these were programs producing audio, they are likely to interrupt the audio stream resulting in dropouts, clicks and pops. Check the Processes tab to see which programs were hit.

Process with highest pagefault count: cleanmgr.exe

Total number of hard pagefaults 769
Hard pagefault count of hardest hit process: 441
Highest hard pagefault resolution time (µs): 31374267389233.90
Total time spent in hard pagefaults (%): 5650424.946606
Number of processes hit: 8


_________________________________________________________________________________________________________
PER CPU DATA
_________________________________________________________________________________________________________
CPU 0 Interrupt cycle time (s): 34.211686
CPU 0 ISR highest execution time (µs): 733106.617120
CPU 0 ISR total execution time (s): 6.221280
CPU 0 ISR count: 302988
CPU 0 DPC highest execution time (µs): 596868.882013
CPU 0 DPC total execution time (s): 3.620036
CPU 0 DPC count: 111454
_________________________________________________________________________________________________________
CPU 1 Interrupt cycle time (s): 3.577804
CPU 1 ISR highest execution time (µs): 356.725853
CPU 1 ISR total execution time (s): 0.279833
CPU 1 ISR count: 7219
CPU 1 DPC highest execution time (µs): 752.344708
CPU 1 DPC total execution time (s): 0.253472
CPU 1 DPC count: 6811
_________________________________________________________________________________________________________
CPU 2 Interrupt cycle time (s): 0.701750
CPU 2 ISR highest execution time (µs): 191.412377
CPU 2 ISR total execution time (s): 0.019042
CPU 2 ISR count: 1579
CPU 2 DPC highest execution time (µs): 177.984962
CPU 2 DPC total execution time (s): 0.045446
CPU 2 DPC count: 2545
_________________________________________________________________________________________________________
CPU 3 Interrupt cycle time (s): 0.327045
CPU 3 ISR highest execution time (µs): 3.961828
CPU 3 ISR total execution time (s): 0.000010
CPU 3 ISR count: 3
CPU 3 DPC highest execution time (µs): 57.319260
CPU 3 DPC total execution time (s): 0.003758
CPU 3 DPC count: 654
_________________________________________________________________________________________________________
CPU 4 Interrupt cycle time (s): 0.393712
CPU 4 ISR highest execution time (µs): 0.0
CPU 4 ISR total execution time (s): 0.0
CPU 4 ISR count: 0
CPU 4 DPC highest execution time (µs): 217.856564
CPU 4 DPC total execution time (s): 0.004323
CPU 4 DPC count: 611
_________________________________________________________________________________________________________
CPU 5 Interrupt cycle time (s): 0.381645
CPU 5 ISR highest execution time (µs): 0.0
CPU 5 ISR total execution time (s): 0.0
CPU 5 ISR count: 0
CPU 5 DPC highest execution time (µs): 211.209948
CPU 5 DPC total execution time (s): 0.005445
CPU 5 DPC count: 914
_________________________________________________________________________________________________________
CPU 6 Interrupt cycle time (s): 0.471726
CPU 6 ISR highest execution time (µs): 2.518219
CPU 6 ISR total execution time (s): 0.000006
CPU 6 ISR count: 3
CPU 6 DPC highest execution time (µs): 180.140544
CPU 6 DPC total execution time (s): 0.008505
CPU 6 DPC count: 845
_________________________________________________________________________________________________________
CPU 7 Interrupt cycle time (s): 0.391911
CPU 7 ISR highest execution time (µs): 0.0
CPU 7 ISR total execution time (s): 0.0
CPU 7 ISR count: 0
CPU 7 DPC highest execution time (µs): 561.349335
CPU 7 DPC total execution time (s): 0.015668
CPU 7 DPC count: 1436
_________________________________________________________________________________________________________
5
Hi Randy,

Thanks for the info.
Regardless of what the latencymon is saying, if you disable the network adapter, does the interface then behave as you'd expect?
If so, then the network card may be the culprit, and may simply need a driver update for that card.
Definitely check to see if there is a BIOS update. Also ensure that you do not have any CPU clocking engaged on your system, including any software that allows CPU clocking (often come as motherboard utility software, Easytune for Gigabyte motherboards etc).

Let me know how you get on.

Simon // Focusrite Technical Support
6
Thanks again, Simon. Forced to take a few days away from this project while life interferes, but I'll get back to it soon and try all of the above!
7
Hello,

I have the exact same issue. I built a new machine around an ASUS Maximus 8 motherboard, a Samsung 950 M.2 drive and 16GB of fast RAM.

I have had terrible issues to get my Saffire 56 to work with it. First I had a DeLock FW400 card and the Saffire would not be recognized although it has a TI chip and even tried Legacy drivers.

Then I installed an ASUS thunderbolt card and while Thunderbolt worked fine, again I could not get the Saffire to be recognized thru the Apple FW adaptor. It would show FW connected in front panel but keep flashing the activity led.

Then I bought an expensive card with another TI chip, and with that I was finally able to get Saffire recognized. It took quite a while and many reboots and even now it sometimes fails to find it...but usually it works really well now without issues except this same latency issue.

I have tried everything I can, disabled each and every card and accessory from USB to network either via Device Manager and nothing helps.

I also installed W10 fresh twice trying to bare the issues, to no change.

As it is, I can run audio fine for a good while upon boot, BUT I have to keep the Saffire latency at maximum setting 2048 or it will immediately start stuttering even playing stereo file in Cubase.

DPC latency programs report just the same as you, no matter what I do...showing huge numbers of Hard Page Faults per second.

It seems incredible that a 4.5GHz i7 6500K with plenty of 2600MHz RAM and a super fast M.2 drive runs audio far worse than my old i5 righ in which the Saffire worked perfectly and I had really low latency. I can't come up with any more ideas to try. BIOS is latest version, have tried with the CPU's Intel display only as well as an NVidia card, have swapped memory chip slots, taken out or disabled everything I can in BIOS and tried all tricks for PC audio optimization I can find from disabling power schemes or hyperthreading and whatnot, I mean literally a hundred reboots and attempts over almost 3 weeks now...and no change. Either the Saffire is not found at all or it stutters.

Now I can put the buffer as small as it goes and play MIDI drums off Cubase without any delay finally, but I can't really play back any audio while I have the buffers under 2048 so it doesn't really help.

I really don't know what to do next...either will have to buy a new soundcard and try to rebuild my studio around it or build another machine, any ideas what I could try would be very very welcome.
8
Hi Deeaa,

You've hit upon a common issue with PCs, in that it's not always the on-paper high spec that matters, more how all of the components work together.

We have noticed that some Firewire cards started having issues with Windows 10 when users updated, this seems to be a compatibility issue between some Firewire chipsets, some motherboards and Windows 10, see our article here:

https://support.focusrite.com/hc/en-gb/articles/207546925-How-can-I-tell-if-my-Firewire-chipset-is-compatible-with-my-interface-

Please can you also download and run the following OHCI app, please screenshot results for me, this will tell us a bit more about your Firewire card(s):

https://owncloud.focusrite.com/owncloud/public.php?service=files&t=b60a0a404f281d28694e0a96c1d7b7f3

Let me know how you get on.
Alternatively, you can contact us via email so we can help you more directly:

https://support.focusrite.com/hc/en-gb

I hope the above helps.
Simon // Focusrite Technical Support