Become a member
Become a member
Continuer avec Google

or
Log in
Log in
Se connecter avec Google

or
learning

Voicings and cadences - Follow-up and end

Harmony Basics - Part 42

The present article closes the mini-series we started with article 39 focusing on the use of voicings within the most common cadences. And we'll finish studying voicings based on added-tone chords looking at the interrupted cadence and rhythm changes. Let's go!

View other articles in this series...

The interrupted cadence with added-tones

The interrupted cadence with added tones I suggest is the following:

Rhythm changes voicings
00:0000:00

To differentiate it even more from the "basic" interrupted cadence presented in article 40, I based it on a II-V-I progression, instead of IV-V-I. All chords are seventh chords with at least an added ninth, and even a 13th for the dominant chord (G).

For the dominant chord, we got rid of the fifth, as in many of our previous examples, to give way to the 13th (E). This allows you to have a constant pedal on the upper voice across the three chords. The bass voice simply follows the progression of the roots.

As for the middle voices, let's start with the two first chords. The two first middle voices don't change between the two chords. The third note, however, follow a downward conjunct motion from C to B. But between the second and third chords, right in the middle of the interrupted cadence itself, all three middle voices move upwards in a parallel conjunct motion. This unified movement of the three middle voices highlights more the modulatory character of the interrupted cadence!

Rhythm changes with added tones

Interrupted cadence voicings
00:0000:00

Once again all chords are seventh chords and most of them have an added ninth, except for the A minor chord where the ninth, B, would've been hardly usable as part of the rhythm changes. Like with the interrupted cadence above, the fifth was suppressed from the dominant chord (G, again) to leave some room for the thirteenth, E, which also allows you to maintain a pedal across all voicings, in this case as the first middle voice.

The upper voice moves down following a progressive conjunct motion with a "pause" between the second and third chords. The lower voice is again made up of root notes of the corresponding chords.

The middle voices, apart from the E pedal we already mentioned, are pretty stable, as usual. The second voice plays two Gs followed by two Fs, while the third one follows a downward conjunct motion between the two first chords (from B to A) and then remains on the same note for the last three chords.

Generally speaking, rhythm changes are an interesting example of what you can achieve with a well-adapted voice-leading. In fact, its iconic bass line and its four-chord structure can already constitute a melody (in embryonic state) in the top voice.

As I announced at the beginning of this article, our brief review of the use of voicings within the framework of cadences has come to an end. In the next article we will deal with a somewhat different formula. Good music-making to everyone!

← Previous article in this series:
Voicings and cadences - Second-to-last installment
Next article in this series:
Left-hand voicings for piano →

Vous souhaitez réagir à cet article ?

Log in
Become a member
cookies

We are using cookies!

Yes, Audiofanzine is using cookies. Since the last thing that we want is disturbing your diet with too much fat or too much sugar, you'll be glad to learn that we made them ourselves with fresh, organic and fair ingredients, and with a perfect nutritional balance. What this means is that the data we store in them is used to enhance your use of our website as well as improve your user experience on our pages (learn more). To configure your cookie preferences, click here.

We did not wait for a law to make us respect our members and visitors' privacy. The cookies that we use are only meant to improve your experience on our website.

Our cookies

Cookies not subject to consent

These are cookies that guarantee the proper functioning of Audiofanzine and allow its optimization. The website cannot function properly without these cookies.

Website preferences

We store your preferences so that you do not have to re-enter them every time your come back (forums options, dark or light theme, classifieds filter, standard or buzz news, newsletters popups...).

Log in

This one makes sure you don't have to re-enter your credentials every time you visit Audiofanzine.

Analytics

This data allows us to understand the use that our visitors make of our website in an attempt to improve it.

Advertising

This information allows us to show you personalized advertisements thanks to which Audiofanzine is financed. By unchecking this box you will still have advertisements but they may be less interesting :)

We did not wait for a law to make us respect our members and visitors' privacy. The cookies that we use are only meant to improve your experience on our website.

Our cookies

Cookies not subject to consent

These are cookies that guarantee the proper functioning of Audiofanzine and allow its optimization. The website cannot function properly without these cookies.

Website preferences

We store your preferences so that you do not have to re-enter them every time your come back (forums options, dark or light theme, classifieds filter, standard or buzz news, newsletters popups...).

Log in

This one makes sure you don't have to re-enter your credentials every time you visit Audiofanzine.

Analytics

This data allows us to understand the use that our visitors make of our website in an attempt to improve it.

Advertising

This information allows us to show you personalized advertisements thanks to which Audiofanzine is financed. By unchecking this box you will still have advertisements but they may be less interesting :)


You can find more details on data protection in our privacy policy.