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Thread Where to set up compressor in my line of things.

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Topic Where to set up compressor in my line of things.
I am recording a live album. Right now I am running three mics (two condensers and an SM 58) into a Behringer PMH 1000, and using the AUX outs to go from the Behringer into a 1/4" channel of my Tascam MkII.

I have gotten a sound that I really like out of the tracks I have recorded so far, and I haven't had problems with level clipping. For the final songs, however, I have a lot of quiet/loud dynamic that goes over a wide range, I have trouble catching the quiet parts with full sound and not distorting during the louds.

I figured that a compressor would help with this problem...

I am about to borrow a Behringer MDX4600 from a friend, and I was wondering where to put it in my setup. I don't know what outs or ins to use for it. I do know a little about compression, but I need some advice for the placement in the lineup of items I have. Also, what do I set the compressor at (a starting place I guess is what I need, to tweak from) when I'm simply trying to make the clipping peaks not clip, and keep the natural sound to line up with my so far satisfactory, un-hardware-compressed tracks?

Thanks,

Michea
2
Once again (as with all the things in which music is involved) there are no rules. From the math and electric point of view a compressor cuts the unwanted harmonics in the signal. On the other side a modulator such as a chorus od wah amplifies the amplitude of the signal. So the problem looks like this, you put distorzion to the guitar signal and you get unwanted (and ofcourse wanted) noise produced bu the cut the distz does to the amplitude of the signal, then you put the comp to reduce the noise and finaly you modulate the signal. Dist->Comp->Mod is the proper way from a tehnical point of view.

But try and experiment, because the sound depends on a lot of factors.

If i have said something wrong i would like to be corrected by the guru-masters of the trade.

HAIL.