Become a member
Become a member

or
Log in
Log in

or
learning
Comment

What is Reamping?

Reamping: How Does It Work?

If you're a guitar player and have started to think about recording your instrument, you may have heard about reamping. But what is that exactly?

The signal of an electric guitar goes through several level stages before it is actually recorded. In a standard recording, the first level is the instrument level (or high impedance, also called Hi-Z) of the signal coming out of the guitar and going into the amp. Then, the signal is preamplified and amplified by the guitar amp and sent to the speaker(s) with enough amplitude to make it/them move. You will then have to put a microphone in front of the speaker(s); and it is the signal coming out of the microphone that will reach the mic input (XLR connector) of a mixer, mic preamp or audio interface. All these include a preamp stage that adjusts the signal so that it can be recorded by a sequencer or a recorder.

Reamping

First of all, reamping means recording the signal directly from the guitar in addition to the signal from the mic placed in front of the speaker. Afterwards you can use this guitar signal to feed another guitar amp or the same amp with different settings. This has several advantages: you can change the amp settings or the microphone type and position after recording. If you don’t like the sound of the amp you originally recorded with, but the performance of the musician is brilliant, you can track again without having to ask the guitarist to come into the studio again. This also allows you to stack the sound of different amps to get a huge tone! Reamping is recommended for home-studio owners and guitar players that work alone because they can first concentrate only on their playing, and then on the sound. There’s a right time for everything!

It goes without saying that the direct guitar signal must also be adjusted to makes sure that it matches the requirements of the recorder or sequencer. Use a DI box that adjusts the signal’s impedance and level while balancing the guitar signal. The goal is to bring the instrument signal level to microphone signal level in order for it to match the mic input (XLR connector) of a mixer, a mic preamp or an audio interface.

But how do you get the guitar signal back into an amp once it has been recorded? Some use a reamping box, which does the exact opposite of a DI box: it changes the line-level signal of your recorder/audio interface to an instrument-level signal that matches the input of your guitar amp. Some people don’t even buy such reamping boxes and consider that adjusting the output level of the recorder is enough. It’s worth giving it a try! You can find reamping boxes from Radial, Palmer or Little Labs.

Would you like to comment this article?

Log in
Become a member
cookies
We are using cookies!

Yes, Audiofanzine is using cookies. Since the last thing that we want is disturbing your diet with too much fat or too much sugar, you'll be glad to learn that we made them ourselves with fresh, organic and fair ingredients, and with a perfect nutritional balance. What this means is that the data we store in them is used to enhance your use of our website as well as improve your user experience on our pages and show you personalised ads (learn more). To configure your cookie preferences, click here.

We did not wait for a law to make us respect our members and visitors' privacy. The cookies that we use are only meant to improve your experience on our website.

Our cookies
Cookies not subject to consent
These are cookies that guarantee the proper functioning of Audiofanzine and allow its optimization. The website cannot function properly without these cookies. Example: cookies that help you stay logged in from page to page or that help customizing your usage of the website (dark mode or filters).
Google Analytics
We are using Google Analytics in order to better understand the use that our visitors make of our website in an attempt to improve it.
Advertising
This information allows us to show you personalized advertisements thanks to which Audiofanzine is financed. By unchecking this box you will still have advertisements but they may be less interesting :) We are using Google Ad Manager to display part of our ads, or tools integrated to our own CMS for the rest. We are likely to display advertisements from our own platform, from Google Advertising Products or from Adform.

We did not wait for a law to make us respect our members and visitors' privacy. The cookies that we use are only meant to improve your experience on our website.

Our cookies
Cookies not subject to consent

These are cookies that guarantee the proper functioning of Audiofanzine. The website cannot function properly without these cookies. Examples: cookies that help you stay logged in from page to page or that help customizing your usage of the website (dark mode or filters).

Google Analytics

We are using Google Analytics in order to better understand the use that our visitors make of our website in an attempt to improve it. When this parameter is activated, no personal information is sent to Google and the IP addresses are anonymized.

Advertising

This information allows us to show you personalized advertisements thanks to which Audiofanzine is financed. By unchecking this box you will still have advertisements but they may be less interesting :) We are using Google Ad Manager to display part of our ads, or tools integrated to our own CMS for the rest. We are likely to display advertisements from our own platform, from Google Advertising Products or from Adform.


You can find more details on data protection in our privacy policy.
You can also find information about how Google uses personal data by following this link.