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Thread Best dynamic microphone under $150 for vocals?

  • 11 replies
  • 8 participants
  • 2,587 views
  • 8 followers
1 Best dynamic microphone under $150 for vocals?
I'm in a small space and can't acoustically treat my room, so I figure a dynamic mic for vocals would be best so as to avoid any unwanted reverberations or outside noise.

I ordered an SM58 but now I'm not so sure it's the best choice, regardless of how popular it is. I've also been looking into the AKG D5, and I've most seriously been considering the Blue Encore 100 and Encore 200 (particularly the latter).

Have any of you had experience with these mics? For a male tenor or baritone, what would you recommend? Should I just go for a cardioid condenser instead?
2
Well a condenser mic is more sensitive. Due your space isues i don't tink it is wise to use a dynamic mic. Normally these have to be driven harder. When singing louder the reflections in the room get louder.

I think the best option is to choose a condenser mic with an absorber behind it.
The singer will block most of the reverb from behind and the absorber takes care of the front.

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It's not about what you got to use ....    but how you use what you got...

[ Post last edited on 11/09/2014 at 03:38:14 ]

3
Of those dynamics, I would go with withever you find cheaper between the encore 100 and the 58. The encore 100 and 200 seem to have very similar frequency responses. SM58 is better for instruments and will do a good job on vocals but wont flatter. The encore 100 will sound better for a singer who wants more air and accentuated highs. The SM58 will, again, do a good job and particularly do a better job with plosives and the proximity effect, and especially with a decent mic pre should provide a good sound. Either way, if you want a dynamic, both choices are the best in that hundred buck price range.

If you want to try a condenser out anyway, you might not be disappointed. An AT2020 is regularly around a hundred bucks and will do a great job for the price, especially if you value boosted highs. You can also find the CAD M179 and Blue Spark for less than 200 bucks, and both are fantastic values.

Either way, so long as you choose 1 or 2 out of the mics mentioned above, you should end up with more than satisfactory results to get started
4
Quote from angelie:
Well a condenser mic is more sensitive. Due your space isues i don't tink it is wise to use a dynamic mic. Normally these have to be driven harder. When singing louder the reflections in the room get louder.

I think the best option is to choose a condenser mic with an absorber behind it.
The singer will block most of the reverb from behind and the absorber takes care of the front.

image.php



Thanks for the tip. Unfortunately, it was too late to cancel the sm58 from amazon before they sent it out (the bastards!), so I'll have to go ahead and wait until I receive it. But after lots of research, I decided to get a condenser as well (namely the CAD M179) for about $115, which I think was an awesome deal. Can't wait to test them out!

The M179 is known for being one of the more quiet condensers out there, so hopefully it'll sound good enough in my room, but in the meantime I'll try and make a DYI absorber when I get around to it. Thanks guys
5
I don't mean to be promoting anything, but it was this problem which prompted me as a professional engineer (who often has to mix tracks recorded from anywhere in the world) to think about The Audio Hunt, why not hire the mic you want, for the time you need, rather than sacrificing quality to own something?

Just my thoughts.... If I had to choose though, I'd find an old SM7b or RE20. They shouldn't cost too much.

Steve
6
+1 on the sm7b, if I ever saw one for less than 150 I would jump on it
7
Quote:
If I had to choose though, I'd find an old SM7b or RE20. They shouldn't cost too much.

RE20's are not only great for recording music, but are also an industry standard for broadcasting and other types of spoken-word recording. I'd love to get my hands on one for video voiceovers. Yet another item for my studio wish list. ;-)
8
With just released a new version of our app called Rës: https://en.audiofanzine.com/other-software-iphone-ipod-touch-ipad/los-rebellos/res-microphone-pocket-library/
It is a microphone library for iPad and iPhone that gives you access to tech specs, prices, response curves, etc. and you can compare 2 mics response curves as well.

This thread is exactly why we built it in the first place...
Check it out and give us feedback, please!
9
If you want to get studio-quality vocals, I wouldn't recommend using a dynamic mic. If you want a good condenser mic at that price range, you're best bet is the AT2020 by Audio Technica. I've used it for recording vocals, and it works great. You should also get a pop blocker to remove any of the popping sounds that come from recording into a microphone. They're not expensive, and it can improve the quality of your recordings.

Hope that helps.

Check out my blog at musicrecordingcenter.com.

10
The AT2020 is a fan favorite for budget condensers, but some say it's too brittle.

In any case, the best bet (when possible) is to test out mics for yourself, as how they sound really depends on the voice/instrument they're recording :)