Slate Digital Virtual Mix Rack
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Slate Digital Virtual Mix Rack

Virtual Mix Rack, Software channel strip from Slate Digital.

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Is this all I need for a good mix?

 
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delayed

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delayed
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1 Posted on 11/10/2014 at 07:33:15Direct link to this post
So I talked to my engineer friends, and most of them say that I would be all set to mix if I had the Slate Virtual Mix Rack that's due to come out soon.

I'm a bit skeptical that one $149 bundle will be all I ever need for a good mix. Would you guys agree, or is there anything you would add or subtract from this long list of...one? :D:

[ Post last edited on 11/10/2014 at 07:34:34 ]

fenderbender88

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2 Posted on 11/10/2014 at 12:20:53Direct link to this post
I hate posts like this. Everyone posts their own plugins they swear by but the truth is, with decent compressors and EQs, you will be able to get most of what you want done.

angelie

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3 Posted on 11/10/2014 at 12:42:47Direct link to this post
I'm not into Plugins but if somebody ofert more than 2 plugins for that prize it can't be much. Like said: even with standard plugins in logic ( example) you get good results.


It's not about what you got to use but how you use what you got.

It's not about what you got to use but how you use what you got.

[ Post last edited on 11/11/2014 at 00:59:17 ]

EQlikeaboss

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4 Posted on 11/11/2014 at 07:24:22Direct link to this post
Quote from angelie:
I'm not into Plugins but if somebody ofert more than 2 plugins for that prize it can't be much. Like said: even with standard plugins in logic ( example) you get good results.


It's not about what you got to use but how you use what you got.


Very true. Plugins are produced to make money, not necessarily to guarantee an improvement in your mix. Outside of Garageband, you often have sufficient tools at your disposal to make a decent mix once you learn how to use them properly.

Having said that, if you aren't happy with the tools you have available, there are a few 'go-tos' that I have that make me confident I can tackle any mix. Here's what I would deem necessary:

  • Tape Emulation
  • Console Emulation
  • EQ and Dynamics (and exciter)
  • Effects (particularly a reverb and echo/delay)


Looks like the Slate VMR will tackle the EQ/dynamics portion. If you dig the warm analogue sound as much as I do, then Slate's VTM and VCC are both fantastic plugins. But everyone has their own taste, so hopefully listing my go-tos in terms of types of plugins will help you decide for yourself what is "all you need". cheers.

Mike Levine

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5 Posted on 11/11/2014 at 14:41:12Direct link to this post
The Slate plug-ins are uniformly excellent (I use the VCC and VTM plugs, myself), but I agree with other posts in this thread that the most important thing first is to master the basics: EQ, compression, reverb, and delay. Virtually every DAW gives you decent versions of those effects. Once you're comfortable with using them, then it's appropriate to move onto to things like console and tape emulation.

angelie

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6 Posted on 11/11/2014 at 22:51:04Direct link to this post
Well maybe i can add another question to this topic. Because i realy can't see the value of it.

Why whould you like to use a console emulation? Isn't much better to get the real thing?
As an example, i own a very old console ( a hill console) which sounds as i please. Ok it is not the best thing on earth i know that but i love the sound of it.
Why fool your self and others by using console emulaotions.

I will try to explain:

the emulation " calculates " the sound so it sounds different. However changing mic preamps, compressors and other equipment influence the sound so that the " calculated " is also effected and so your sound does not sound like a " famous " console.

So to me this is rather pointless or do i mis something and missing the point. :-?

It's not about what you got to use but how you use what you got.

EQlikeaboss

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7 Posted on 11/12/2014 at 01:45:26Direct link to this post
Quote from angelie:
Well maybe i can add another question to this topic. Because i realy can't see the value of it.

Why whould you like to use a console emulation? Isn't much better to get the real thing?
As an example, i own a very old console ( a hill console) which sounds as i please. Ok it is not the best thing on earth i know that but i love the sound of it.
Why fool your self and others by using console emulaotions.

I will try to explain:

the emulation " calculates " the sound so it sounds different. However changing mic preamps, compressors and other equipment influence the sound so that the " calculated " is also effected and so your sound does not sound like a " famous " console.

So to me this is rather pointless or do i mis something and missing the point. :-?


I think in theory, you're right. But above all else, the point of console emulation (or ANY emulator, for that matter, like amp sims, effects, etc) is to give people the opportunity to achieve (ideally) similar results without having to have all the hardware.

In a dream world I would own my own Neve console, but unfortunately I have such a small studio space that any console hardware is out of the question.

And while I agree that often times, the efforts made to calculate then digitally replicate analogue hardware, sounds mind-numbingly, obviously digital and, well, replicated, the whole reason there are $300+ plugins out there is because certain manufacturers are doing a good job of achieving the sound of the "real thing".

I also use Slate VCC and VTM, and while if you apply either on one track and listen, the effect is subtle and barely noticeable, when applied across all tracks it's truly impressive how much warmer and more authentic your final sound is.

And going on Slate's site, I was impressed at the development process and how they try and emulate the intricate nuances of the relevant circuit paths instead of simply hear the final sound on hardware then try and develop an algorithm like that. I'm not doing a good job of explaining it, and maybe what they do is, in fact, what a million other plugin manufacturers do, but for the home studio I think it works and does a fantastic job of getting closer to that analogue sound without making it so obvious

DJWicked

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8 Posted on 11/20/2014 at 03:59:35Direct link to this post
Quote from delayed:
So I talked to my engineer friends, and most of them say that I would be all set to mix if I had the Slate Virtual Mix Rack that's due to come out soon.

I'm a bit skeptical that one $149 bundle will be all I ever need for a good mix. Would you guys agree, or is there anything you would add or subtract from this long list of...one? :D:


The slate VMR looks really cool, but if you're just trying to learn to mix, use whatever comes with your DAW at first. For example, I use Studio One 2, which comes with its own compressors, EQs, reverb, etc. Now that I know what I'm doing, I've upgraded to some other plugins that I prefer, but the most useful thing you can do is try and understand the specific parameters and controls of your standard plugins.

Thinks like attack, threshold, etc for your compressor, for example. These controls will generally be available on many other plugins, so familiarize yourself with them. Then when you get to the point where you can make decent changes with your standard plugins due to a sufficient understanding of the parameters, you can upgrade and REALLY up your game
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