Become a member
Become a member

or
Continue with Google
Log in
Log in

or
Log in using a Google account
Add this product to
  • Mon ancien matos
  • My current gear
  • My wishlist
Gibson Explorer '76 Reissue
Images
1/700
Gibson Explorer '76 Reissue

V/XPL/FB Shaped Guitar from Gibson belonging to the Explorer series.

Price engine
Classified Ads
Forums
< Return to the list of user reviews
King Loudness King Loudness

« Cool reissue »

Published on 08/30/11 at 08:54
The Gibson Explorer '76 is a reissue of the reissue of one of Gibson's infamous "modernistic" guitars from the late fifties, the Gibson Explorer. They were not well received at the time of their debut and only a handful were made. However, demand in the '60s led them to reissue the first model, the Flying V. In 1976 Gibson followed suit with a reissue of the Explorer guitar, and it was quickly adopted by many players in the hard rock and metal world that was rapidly expanding at that time. This guitar features all mahogany construction (body and neck) a rosewood fretboard with 22 frets and dot inlays, Grover tuners, a tune-o-matic bridge and stopbar tailpiece, and dual Gibson humbuckers (a 496R in the neck position and a 500T in the bridge). It has a fairly simple control layout of two volume controls (one per pickup) a master tone, and a 3 way selector switch to toggle between the pickups. They're built in Gibson's USA plant in Nashville, TN.

UTILIZATION

The Gibson Explorer is a fairly light guitar considering its size and sits reasonably well on the body. However, because of the somewhat large and cumbersome shape, it's not exactly the most ergonomic guitar on the planet. Depending on your physical size, the Explorer may dwarf you so it's not really a guitar I'd recommend for smaller players to use. The upper fret access is reasonably good on these guitars fortunately, so getting to those high notes is not an issue.

Getting a good sound out of this guitar is fairly simple. There's not a whole lot of switching options for players to deal with, so that makes getting good tones out of this guitar fairly simple. It's aimed at the rock/metal player primarily, and the pickups are quite high output, so it's a guitar that is presumed to do best at high gain tones as opposed to jazzy/bluesy clean textures.

SOUNDS

The guitar is one that is certainly aimed at players who are looking for a high octane and very crunchy sounding guitar for hard rock or metal styles. My favourite sounds with this guitar are using it for thrash metal tones a la old school Metallica or Megadeth. It's not often that I play those types of music, but when I've tried the Explorer, those sort of sounds seem to come naturally from the guitar. The clean tones are not bad, but the pickups are fairly high output and the vast majority of clean tones that I dialed in sounded fairly overbearing with not a lot of dynamics or subtlety to them.

The drive tones are great for sure. They offer a nice range from classic hard rock tones (think The Scorpions or Van Halen) all the way to crushing modern metal sounds used by many bands of today. The pickups retain lots of definition and clarity at higher gain/high volume settings too, so that's a definite plus. They're not quite as tight as say, EMGs, but it provides a good range of tones from the sane to the insane.

OVERALL OPINION

All in all I think the Gibson Explorer '76 is a great reissue of the venerable and pointy classic. It's priced very reasonably at $1,399 new and is fairly well crafted and of course it's made by Gibson in the US of A. They're a great value for money (as many of the cheaper Gibsons are) and if you're looking for a guitar that flat out says no to tradition and just wants to rock, the Gibson Explorer is worth a shot for sure.
cookies

We are using cookies!

Yes, Audiofanzine is using cookies. Since the last thing that we want is disturbing your diet with too much fat or too much sugar, you'll be glad to learn that we made them ourselves with fresh, organic and fair ingredients, and with a perfect nutritional balance. What this means is that the data we store in them is used to enhance your use of our website as well as improve your user experience on our pages (learn more). To configure your cookie preferences, click here.

We did not wait for a law to make us respect our members and visitors' privacy. The cookies that we use are only meant to improve your experience on our website.

Our cookies

Cookies not subject to consent

These are cookies that guarantee the proper functioning of Audiofanzine and allow its optimization. The website cannot function properly without these cookies.

Website preferences

We store your preferences so that you do not have to re-enter them every time your come back (forums options, dark or light theme, classifieds filter, standard or buzz news, newsletters popups...).

Log in

This one makes sure you don't have to re-enter your credentials every time you visit Audiofanzine.

Analytics

This data allows us to understand the use that our visitors make of our website in an attempt to improve it.

Advertising

This information allows us to show you personalized advertisements thanks to which Audiofanzine is financed. By unchecking this box you will still have advertisements but they may be less interesting :)

We did not wait for a law to make us respect our members and visitors' privacy. The cookies that we use are only meant to improve your experience on our website.

Our cookies

Cookies not subject to consent

These are cookies that guarantee the proper functioning of Audiofanzine and allow its optimization. The website cannot function properly without these cookies.

Website preferences

We store your preferences so that you do not have to re-enter them every time your come back (forums options, dark or light theme, classifieds filter, standard or buzz news, newsletters popups...).

Log in

This one makes sure you don't have to re-enter your credentials every time you visit Audiofanzine.

Analytics

This data allows us to understand the use that our visitors make of our website in an attempt to improve it.

Advertising

This information allows us to show you personalized advertisements thanks to which Audiofanzine is financed. By unchecking this box you will still have advertisements but they may be less interesting :)


You can find more details on data protection in our privacy policy.